LA RADIOLOGIE DE LA GUERRE by [WWI.] CURIE, Marie.

LA RADIOLOGIE DE LA GUERRE by [WWI.] CURIE, Marie.
  • Another image of LA RADIOLOGIE DE LA GUERRE by [WWI.] CURIE, Marie.
  • Another image of LA RADIOLOGIE DE LA GUERRE by [WWI.] CURIE, Marie.
  • Another image of LA RADIOLOGIE DE LA GUERRE by [WWI.] CURIE, Marie.
  • Another image of LA RADIOLOGIE DE LA GUERRE by [WWI.] CURIE, Marie.
  • Another image of LA RADIOLOGIE DE LA GUERRE by [WWI.] CURIE, Marie.
  • Another image of LA RADIOLOGIE DE LA GUERRE by [WWI.] CURIE, Marie.
  • Another image of LA RADIOLOGIE DE LA GUERRE by [WWI.] CURIE, Marie.
Marie and Irène Curie’s WWI efforts described

LA RADIOLOGIE DE LA GUERRE Avec 11 figures et 16 planches hors texte. Paris, Librairie Félix Alcan, 108, Boulevard Saint-Germain, 108. Tous droits de reproduction, d’adaptation et de traduction réservés pour tous pays.

1921. 8vo, pp. [iv], 143, [1]; with 16 half-tone plates and numerous text illustrations; printed on poor quality and as a result somewhat fragile and delicate, though expertly repaired notably along the gutters of the first few leaves, and with several marginal repairs using Japanese paper; opening slightly restricted and caution required however, and edges still somewhat fragile; First edition, though a rather fragile copy, of this important work giving a summary of her pioneering efforts during World War I, and providing an informative account of the scientific advances of radiology during the war. It is much rarer than her technical publications. Curie devoted much of her time during the four years of the war to equipping automobiles in her own laboratory with x-ray apparatus, these cars becoming known in the war zone as “little Curies”. ‘Marie had established a fleet of donated vehicles outfitted with dynamo-powered x-ray units. One car carried Marie, Irène, and a military staff consisted of a doctor, an assistant, and a driver. The apparatus itself was fairly straightforward, but the task was daunting. In many cases the men were very badly wounded ... by the time the first radiology unit had set off towards the front on 1st November 1914, 310,000 French soldiers had already died and 300,000 were wounded. For a young person of seventeen who had lived within a protected circle of friends and relatives, the scenes of horror and misery were a great shock. A short nursing course given by Les Dames des France left Irène ill prepared for what she would see and experience. The tragedies she witnessed marked her with a lifetime horror or war’ (Rayner-Carter, p. 106). The war effort was to prove physically and financial demanding for Marie as well, though she continued to work tirelessly and 1919 saw her installation at the Radium Institute. Grolier Club, ‘Extraordinary Women, pp. 46-52, and item 35; See Rayner-Carter, A Devotion to their Science, p. 106; see also http://nobelprize.org for a detailed biography; OCLC locates copies at Columbia, the New York Academy of Medicine, Yale, Smithsonian, Harvard, Duke, Texas, Pittsburgh, Alabama, Arizona, Caltech and Cambridge.

Condition: in the original tan printed wrappers, expertly repaired and restored with Japanese paper, covers rather soiled; ex-libris form the Franklin Institute Library with their book-plate on inside upper wrappers, remains of label on final leaf, and ticket pocket on inside rear cover; housed within custom-made cloth bound clamshell case, with remains of paper label on spine and retaining cloth ties.

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