PHILIPP HAINHOFER UND DER KUNSTSCHRANK GUSTAV ADOLFS IN UPSALA by…

PHILIPP HAINHOFER UND DER KUNSTSCHRANK GUSTAV ADOLFS IN UPSALA by BÖTTIGER, John. < >
  • Another image of PHILIPP HAINHOFER UND DER KUNSTSCHRANK GUSTAV ADOLFS IN UPSALA by BÖTTIGER, John.
  • Another image of PHILIPP HAINHOFER UND DER KUNSTSCHRANK GUSTAV ADOLFS IN UPSALA by BÖTTIGER, John.
  • Another image of PHILIPP HAINHOFER UND DER KUNSTSCHRANK GUSTAV ADOLFS IN UPSALA by BÖTTIGER, John.
  • Another image of PHILIPP HAINHOFER UND DER KUNSTSCHRANK GUSTAV ADOLFS IN UPSALA by BÖTTIGER, John.
  • Another image of PHILIPP HAINHOFER UND DER KUNSTSCHRANK GUSTAV ADOLFS IN UPSALA by BÖTTIGER, John.
  • Another image of PHILIPP HAINHOFER UND DER KUNSTSCHRANK GUSTAV ADOLFS IN UPSALA by BÖTTIGER, John.
  • Another image of PHILIPP HAINHOFER UND DER KUNSTSCHRANK GUSTAV ADOLFS IN UPSALA by BÖTTIGER, John.
  • Another image of PHILIPP HAINHOFER UND DER KUNSTSCHRANK GUSTAV ADOLFS IN UPSALA by BÖTTIGER, John.
  • Another image of PHILIPP HAINHOFER UND DER KUNSTSCHRANK GUSTAV ADOLFS IN UPSALA by BÖTTIGER, John.
  • Another image of PHILIPP HAINHOFER UND DER KUNSTSCHRANK GUSTAV ADOLFS IN UPSALA by BÖTTIGER, John.
  • Another image of PHILIPP HAINHOFER UND DER KUNSTSCHRANK GUSTAV ADOLFS IN UPSALA by BÖTTIGER, John.
  • Another image of PHILIPP HAINHOFER UND DER KUNSTSCHRANK GUSTAV ADOLFS IN UPSALA by BÖTTIGER, John.

PHILIPP HAINHOFER UND DER KUNSTSCHRANK GUSTAV ADOLFS IN UPSALA I - [IV]. [Übersetzung von Dr. Ernst A. Meyer Stockholm. Gedruckt in 200 Numerierten exeplaren in der Hofbuchdruckerei idun in Stockholm...Heliogravüren, Klischees und pläne ausgeführt in der Lithographischen anstalt des generalstabs]. Stockholm: Verlag der Lithographischen Anstalt des Generalstabs.

1909-1910. Four volumes, folio; I. pp. [x], 74, [1], with 8 text figures, and 10 heliogravures each with printed tissue sheet (nos. 1-10); II. pp. [x], 98, [1], [1] tipped in slip, with 101 text figures, 19 heliogravures with printed tissue sheets (nos. 11-29), two folding plates and 8 lithographs; III. pp. [xiv], 109, [3], [ii] half title, 24 of printed music, [1] tipped in slip, with 51 text figures, and four heliogravures with printed tissue sheets (nos. 33-33); IV. pp. [xiv], [ii] ‘Bihang’, [31], [1] blank, with 78 plates of mounted half-tones (nos. 34-108); aside from some very occasional minor foxing or soiling, clean and crisp; a lovely wide-margined set, printed on fine laid paper, bound in tan half-goatskin over marbled boards, spines in compartments with raised bands, ruled and lettered in gilt and black, some minor wear, but otherwise a lovely copy. First edition of this luxuriously produced and exquisitely illustrated limited edition, one of only 200 copies (though unnumbered), celebrating the famous 17th century artistic curiosity cabinet created by the Augsburg merchant, banker, diplomat and art collector Philip Hainhofer (1578-1647). One of a number of specially commission Kunstschränke formed during the Thirty Years War, it was purchased by the city, and handed over as a gift to King Gustav II Adolf of Sweden, when he marched into Augsburg on April 24th 1632. The magnificent cabinet of curiosities and art objects was moved to Sweden in 1633 and set up at Svartsjö Castle. The gift also included an attendant carpenter, to take care of the cabinet, and he remained with the collection until his death in 1651. At that time it was moved to Uppsala Castle, and was donated by King Charles XI to Uppsala University in 1694, and is now on display in a room in the Museum Gustavianum.
Hainhofer is considered to be one of the most important figures in the sphere of art and collecting in the first half of the 17th century, due to his diplomatic and political career, which enabled him to travel extensively through Italy, Germany and the Netherlands. Fluent in several languages, he conveyed political and cultural information, and even represented his patrons at princely ceremonies such as baptisms and marriages, as well as at political gatherings. Expanding his field of enterprise, he began to trade in art and luxury items, including books, acting as agent for a number of leading European princes. He began to develop his own personal Kunstkammer, which came to play a part in his commercial activities, curiosities being be exchanged or sold, between patrons. We have no inventory of his own collection, but his enthusiasm with cabinets of curiosities led him to visit several of the great princely collections of the age, and his own collection, according to Boström was also visited by many distinguished guests. ‘His truly original achievement lies in his pieces of multi-purpose furniture, especially his great Kunstschränke. These Mehrzweckmöbel, manufactured under his supervision by dozens of artists and craftsmen from various guilds, are, or were at least intended to be, miniature Kunstkammern... these cabinets were made to commission’ (Boström, in Impey, Origins of Museums, p. 92). ‘We are better informed about the Kunstschrank of Gustavus Adolphus. It was manufactured between 1625 and 1631, remaining in Hainhofer’s house until the Swedish king’s troops entered Augsburg in April 1632. The Lutheran councillors, who were reinstated by Gustavus Adolphus, wished to welcome the king with a magnificent gift, so the council bought the cabinet from Hainhofer for 6,500 thalers. The presentation took place in the Fugger palace, with Hainhofer demonstrating it for the king, whom he describes as ‘versed in all sciences and a master of all arts’. Hainhofer had played an important role as mediator between Catholics and Lutherans prior to the surrender of Augsburg... Hainhofer’s Kunstschränk give expression to the desire for an all-embracing documentation of the world and of human activities. In the Uppsala cabinet the animal, plant and mineral kingdoms are represented, the four continents known at that time and every historical period from antiquity up to Hainhofer’s own day. Instruments fulfilling the needs of practical everyday life, of work and study, stand alongside those supplying pastimes and aesthetic pleasure. As with the Kunstkammern, this quest for universality it modified by a focus on the rare, the peculiar, the precious and, in the case of artefacts, on objects characterized by artistic refinement, a high level of craftsmanship and the surmounting of technical difficulties’ (p. 95).
Other notable Hainhofer cabinets include that of the Duke Phillip II of Pomerenia, for whom he created the Pommerscher Kunstschränkt (Pomeranian curiosity cabinet), made in 1615-1617, and considered to be the finest and most famous of all the examples. Sadly it was destroyed in a fire during a Berlin bombing campaign at the end of WWII. Another Hainhofer cabinets, created for Augustus Duke of Brunswick-Luneberg is preserved in the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, with a further example found in Florence.
John Böttiger (1853-1936) was a noted Swedish art historian, and Royal Court archivist and curator from 1892 to Oscar II. The present beautifully produced description of the history of the collection and its rich content, was one of a number of works published by Böttiger, to raise public awareness of, and interest in, art history and treasures, having published another magnificent four volume work between 1895-1989 giving a history and descriptive list of the Swedish State Collection of Woven Wallpapers.

Bibliography: See Hans-Olof Boström, ‘Philip Hainhofer and Gustavus Adolphus’s Kunstschank in Uppsala’, Chapter 11 in The Origins of Museums, edited by Oliver Impey and Arthur MacGregor.

Print this page View basket Price: £1,500.00