PSEUDO REGENCY BRASS CALENDAR MEDAL WITH TWO REVOLVING DISCS, by…

PSEUDO REGENCY BRASS CALENDAR MEDAL WITH TWO REVOLVING DISCS, by [POCKET PERPETUAL CALENDAR.] < >
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PSEUDO REGENCY BRASS CALENDAR MEDAL WITH TWO REVOLVING DISCS, with inscriptions and tables indicating days of the week, days of the month, phases of the moon etc, movable discs secured by a central rivet, unsigned, n.p. but England, ca. early 19th century.

ca. 1820. Single brass (low zinc?) multi-component calendar medal, 36mm in diametre, concentric discs with inscriptions and tables secured by a central rivet; one disc thicker and larger into which two thinner and smaller revolving discs have been set, one on the obverse and one on reverse, with a small pin on each revolving disc to facilitate turning; with ribbed edge; a couple of minor stains, but otherwise particularly bright and fine. An anonymously produced, appealing multi-component calendar medal with two revolving discs. Two similar examples (one a variant) found at the British Museum are thought by them to be later 18th century, though it could perhaps be late Regency, and so early 19th century.
Two thinner, smaller revovling discs have been set within a larger outer disck, secured by a central rivet. Each of the smaller discs has a small pin to facilitate turning.
Each side has concentric discs with inscriptions and tables. The two outer circles on both obverse and reverse are marked with a repetitive inscription indicating days of the week. On the obverse side, the revolving disc is then numbered 1 - 31, with at the centre the inscription ‘Days of the Month for Ever’ and a small smiling effigy of the sun.
On the reverse side, the outer edge of the revolving disc is numbered 1 - 30, then a small circle marking the hours in roman numerals, and finally the small central panel ‘Moons Age Phases & Southing’. There is an inscribed F and N to show New and Full moon. The area of the ring around the F is smooth, and around the N is textured, indicating the increasing and diminishing light of the moon. The variant example noted reads instead ‘High Water and Moons Age’.
A further Curator’s note against this variant (BM 1901,1115.31) points the reader towards a chapter entitle 'The Renaissance in Northern Europe' in 'Fake? The Art of Deception' ed. Mark Jones, British Museum, 1990 (pp. 204-210, cat no.220a, https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_LaUnOztbkP4C). In all honesty, we are not entirely sure as to why! However, it does pose the possibility that some believe this to be an early Victorian pseudo-Regency imitation. Nevertheless, a scarce and appealing example.

Bibliography: See Silke Ackermann Maths and memory: Calendar medals in the British Museum, Part 2, no 110, p. 17 (The Medal, No. 46, 2005), and British Museum 1901,1115.30; for the variant see Ackermann 111 and BM 1901,1115.31; Ward, A catalogue of scientific instruments in the Department of Medieval and Later Antiquities of the British Museum, 374 and 375 (variant).

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