GEBURTSHILFLICHES TASCHENPHANTOM by MUELLER, Arthur.

GEBURTSHILFLICHES TASCHENPHANTOM by MUELLER, Arthur. < >
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Portable aid to teach obstetrics and forceps delivery

GEBURTSHILFLICHES TASCHENPHANTOM zur Darstellung des Beckenausgangs-Mechanismus der Kopflagen und der Operationen bei denselben nebst einer Besprechung der Eintheilung, Diagnose, Pathologie und Therapie der Kopflagen. München, Verlag von J. F. Lehmann.

1899. 8vo, pp. [3] advertisements including inside cover, 51, [1] blank, 19 advertisements including rear inside cover; with three large folding lithograph plates, together with an accompanying 3 dimensional wood and metal model of the female pelvis, in cross section, mounted on inside front cover, with an inserted die-cut board retaining 5 wooden foetal heads each punctured with two metal pins, though without the small metal forceps originally found; some wear to inside front cover from the wooden heads, the die-cut board stapled at head and tail and with three metal rivets (two slightly obscuring some of the adverts on verso); insignificant puncture holes from one of the rivets affecting the advertisements and first couple of gatherings, text a little browned due to paper quality; contemporary, though illegible signature at head of title-page and on upper cover of boards; in the original publisher’s green cloth, upper cover lettered in black, spine a little sunned, extremities lightly worn; a scarce survivor. Rare first edition of this innovative pocket book with accompanying three dimensional model in wood and metal, devised by Dr Arthur Mueller (1863-1926), an assistant physician at the Woman's Clinic at the University of Munich, and after whom a couple of manoeuvres to aid breech deliveries were named.
As Mueller notes in his preface, together with a colleague he had been asked to undertake a review of the teaching of practical obstetrics in the summer of 1898, and found the clinic to be lacking an a Schultze obstetrics phantom - the large model of the female pelvis devised by Professor Bernard Sigmund Schultze (1827-1919), Director of the University Women’s Clinic in Jena, and widely used to demonstrate the mechanism of childbirth and the application of forceps. Such a lack made practical demonstrations difficult, and although there was access to Dr Koichi Shibata ‘taschenphantom’, a small portable work devised whilst a student under Professor Franz von Winckel at the Munich Woman's Clinic, Mueller had found this to be insufficient. Whilst able to represent foetal positions, it did not allow for the demonstration of the mechanism of birth itself and in particular differing head positions, and could not be used to teach forceps deliveries. ‘In order to be able to clearly demonstrate the latter operations without a large phantom, I made the following... the construction of this was made possible by my views on the mutual relationships between the shape of the head and the mechanism of birth, which I have explained in several essays’.
Like Shibata, the work is once gain intended for the use of students, the aim being to provide a portable practice aid, though Mueller has used wooden cut-out figures rather than a moveable manikin. Once again a pelvis, this time made of wood and metal, has been attached to one of the paste-downs. As with other copies located, the present copy sadly the forceps, but does retain all of the foetal heads. ‘Mueller’s book explicating the various positions of the foetus as it descends through the birth canal during delivery is accompanied by an interactive anatomical model of a female pelvis. It illustrates changes to the foetal head and the use of forceps. Forceps for delivery were first invented in the sixteenth century and new designs were developed over time. Anatomical models were often used for both students and practitioners to learn new methods. In this case, the interactive model allows the reader to train in procedures and positioning of forceps for delivery’ (Duke, online exhibit, Five Hundred Years of Women’s Work).

Bibliography: OCLC locates copies at the NYAM, Harvard, the National Library of Medicine, the College of Physicians, Duke, UCLA, Paris, Bayern, Berlin, Munich, Mainz, and Strasbourg; the copy at Bayern is also missing forceps and one head and part of pelvis. https://exhibits.library.duke.edu/exhibits/show/baskin/item/4221

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