Browse

  • From a patient ‘on the mend’ to his Doctor and fellow ‘regulars’
    SCHOENBRUNN by [HYDROTHERAPY.] [AMUSING ENGRAVED BROADSIDE ILLUSTRATED IN WATERCOLOUR.]
    [HYDROTHERAPY.] [AMUSING ENGRAVED BROADSIDE ILLUSTRATED IN WATERCOLOUR.]
    SCHOENBRUNN Au Docteur Hegglin et aux habitants de Schoenbrunn. Souvenir d’un retapé. 1880-1885. [n.p., n.d. but ca. 1890s-1900].

    1880. Single sheet of thick artist paper, 315 x 245mm, with central oval view of Bad Schoenbrunn done in watercolour, surrounded by a series of satirical black and white silhouette sketches and vignettes seemingly engraved, though possibly executed in pen and ink; print mounted on card 435 x 345mm; small correction made to the lower central silhouette, with what appears to be a very small photograph image of the head of Peter Joseph Hegglin, pasted on to replace original image; some light spotting and browning, otherwise very striking. An enchanting and unique ‘souvenir’ from the famous health resort of Bad Schönbrunn in Menzingen. Sadly anonymous, and seemingly executed at the turn of the century, the striking broadside comprises an appealing…

    (more)

    1880. Single sheet of thick artist paper, 315 x 245mm, with central oval view of Bad Schoenbrunn done in watercolour, surrounded by a series of satirical black and white silhouette sketches and vignettes seemingly engraved, though possibly executed in pen and ink; print mounted on card 435 x 345mm; small correction made to the lower central silhouette, with what appears to be a very small photograph image of the head of Peter Joseph Hegglin, pasted on to replace original image; some light spotting and browning, otherwise very striking. An enchanting and unique ‘souvenir’ from the famous health resort of Bad Schönbrunn in Menzingen. Sadly anonymous, and seemingly executed at the turn of the century, the striking broadside comprises an appealing central watercolour vignette of the Spa buildings, set against an idyllic background of rolling hills, woodland and distant snow-capped mountains. This vignette is surrounded by a series of black and white silhouette vignettes, seemingly engraved, though resembling pen and ink drawings. Through this series of enchanting scenes, we are shown a number of the diversions, healthy activities, and treatments, on offer at the Spa. Those at the head of the broadside represent some of the outdoor and leisure activities available to patrons, including gentle walks in the countryside, a game of skittles, three men enjoying a game of billiards, musical soirees, painting, and nature watching. The silhouettes below the central oval focus more upon the treatments, a rather startled looking figure enduring various cold showers, towel wraps, and cold water hosing.
    Two figures can be seen at the tail of the image - one seemingly taking the pulse of the other, as he is holding a pocket watch in his hand. Above the two figures flies a wreath-bearing dove. Of added appeal, the head of the ‘doctor’ has been replaced with what appears to be a very small original photograph image. We presume this to be that of Peter Joseph Hegglin (1832-1893) himself, the founder of the Spa in 1857, although it could also be his son Joseph Hegglin-Kerckhoffs (1862-1920) who appears to have taken over the running of the establishment. It eventually closed in 1926.
    Sadly anonymous, the impression is that this wonderful ‘souvenir’ has been created by a previous patient ‘now on the mend’, and who has perhaps had a small number of these engravings published to give as gifts to his fellow patients and the good Doctor. A unique and most charming depiction.
    Two further attractive watercolour depiction's of the Spa are included with this image.

    (less)
    View basket More details Price: £1,500.00
  • Including the scarce and innovative ‘Human Industrial Palace’ chart
    DAS LEBEN DES MENSCHEN by KAHN, Fritz.
    KAHN, Fritz.
    DAS LEBEN DES MENSCHEN Eine volkstümliche Anatomie, Biologie, Physiologie und Entwicklungsgeschichte des Menschen. Band 1 - [Band V]. Stuttgart, Kosmos, Gesellschaft der Naturfreunde, Geschäftstelle: Franckh’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, 1922, [1924, 1926, 1929,

    1931]. Five volumes, 4to; I. pp. viii, 272, with 20 plates on ten leaves (one coloured); II. pp. vi, 364, with 36 plates on 18 leaves (of which 4 coloured), with three advertisements loosely inserted; III. pp. vi, 364, with 35 plates on 23 leaves (of which one double-page, and 20 coloured), and with slip pasted in at p. 111, plate XII somewhat browned; IV. pp. viii, 335, [1] with 33 plates on 20 leaves (of which one double-page, three folding, and 12 coloured), with one advertisement slipped in; V. pp. viii, 267, [1], with 23 plates on 15 leaves (of which 13 coloured, and one with an overlay), with two advertisements loosely inserted, and with large folding chromolithograph plate…

    (more)

    1931]. Five volumes, 4to; I. pp. viii, 272, with 20 plates on ten leaves (one coloured); II. pp. vi, 364, with 36 plates on 18 leaves (of which 4 coloured), with three advertisements loosely inserted; III. pp. vi, 364, with 35 plates on 23 leaves (of which one double-page, and 20 coloured), and with slip pasted in at p. 111, plate XII somewhat browned; IV. pp. viii, 335, [1] with 33 plates on 20 leaves (of which one double-page, three folding, and 12 coloured), with one advertisement slipped in; V. pp. viii, 267, [1], with 23 plates on 15 leaves (of which 13 coloured, and one with an overlay), with two advertisements loosely inserted, and with large folding chromolithograph plate printed by Fricke & Co., ‘Des Mensch als Industriepalast’ 98 x 49cms, housed within pocket at rear, together with accompanying 12pp pamphlet ‘Des Mensch als Industriepalast’, and a further folding plate ‘Stammbaum des Menschen’, and a pair of 3-D glasses to be used with plates IX and X; some occasional light foxing and browning through all volumes due to paper quality, with some occasional light marginal dampstaining, but otherwise generally clean and crisp; an appealing set in the original blue publisher’s cloth, with title in blind on upper cover, and spines lettered in gilt, spines all slightly sunned, with some light rubbed to head and tails of spines and to joints (more noticeably Vols I. & II.), covers all a little sunned and foxed, extremities lightly rubbed. A fine set, all in first edition, of this copiously illustrated five volume work on the inner workings of the human body, published over a decade by the noted German gynaecologist and science author Fritz Kahn (1888-1968), and unusually retaining the original famous anatomical wall chart, ‘Der Mensch als Industriepalast’ or the ‘Human Industrial Palace’, as well as the pair of 3D glasses to be used with plates IX and X in the final volume.
    Kahn developed a sophisticated graphic analogy between anatomy and machinery. His modernist visualization of the digestive and respiratory system as “industrial palace”, really a chemical plant, was conceived at the height of Weimar Germany’s rapid and advanced industrialisation, in conjunction with the artistic experimentation of the Bauhaus and Dada movements. The resulting illustrative style remains as evocative today as it was nearly a century ago. ‘Das Leben des Menschen’ or ‘The Life of Man’, was published between 1922 and 1931, using ‘visual metaphors drawn from industrial society - assembly lines, internal combustion engines, refineries, dynamos, telephones, etc. The body in Kahn’s work was “modern” and productive, a theme visually emphasized through his use of modernist art styles. Though his books sold well, his Jewishness and public advocacy of progressive reform made him a target for Nazi attacks’ (Sappol, Dream Anatomy, p. 144). “Prolonged by the inflation crisis of 1923 and the economic depression at the end of the 1920s, but also by the difficulties of containing the increasingly extensive material in the initially planned volumes, the book finally amounted to more than 1,600 pages, with the last of its fifty binders issued and distributed in 1931, a decade after the start of the project. More than a thousand illustrations were included in the five volumes, and almost 150 colour plates” (Borck, "Communicating the Modern Body", Canadian Journal of Communications). Kahn continued to publish, relocating to Palestine and Paris before escaping to the USA with the help of Albert Einstein.
    ‘In 1951, an example of [Kahn’s] poster was selected by Barbara Jones to feature in her exhibition of popular art at the Whitechapel entitled ‘Black Eyes and Lemonade’. Eduardo Paolozzi is understood to have visited the exhibition and viewed Kahn’s print. Paolozzi later produced the series “Secrets of Life - the Human Machine and How it works” which was inspired by the graphic works of Fritz Kahn’ (Christies Sale 9935, lot 132, 2013). It was presumably at this stage that it came to the attention of Adam Rouilly & Company, the famous London manufacturers of medical teaching aids, and who published their own version of the chart. It was to later inspire in 2006 the German artist Henning Lederer to create an interactive and animated installation based upon the poster.
    The first three volumes went through a number of editions, Kahn taking the opportunity to revise the works as subsequent volumes were published, amending some of the images included. Having previously now held a couple of sets, it would appear that even the later editions also include some variations, predominantly in the number of coloured images included - suggesting once again constant revision by Kahn.
    A copy of the famous image made $3750 in the Dean Edell Anatomy as Art sale, (Christies, October 5th, 2007, lot 224). Another realised £3750 at the Out of the Ordinary Sale (CSK September 5th, 2013, lot 132). The imprints also display some variants, with the present example reading: ‘Aus Kahn, Das Leben des Menschen/Franckh’sche Verlagshandlung, Stuttgart/Offsetdruckerei Fricke & Co. Stuttgart’ (the Edell example read ‘Beitrage zu Kahn, Das Leben des Menschen/Franck’schen Verlagshandlung, Stuttgart).

    (less)
    View basket More details Price: £3,000.00
  • Scarce and unusual compact presentation of factors and primes
    FACTOREN UND PRIMZAHLENTAFEL by KRAUSE, Karl Christian.
    KRAUSE, Karl Christian.
    FACTOREN UND PRIMZAHLENTAFEL von 1 bis 100000 neuberechnet und zweckmässig eingerichtet nebst einer Gebrauchsanleitung und Abhandlung der Lehre von Factoren und Primzahlen. Für Mathematiker, Rchenlehrer und Kaufleute. Jena und Leipzig bei Christian Ernst Gabler.

    1804. Small folio, pp. [iv], 22, 28; pp. 21-22 bound upside down; title-page with light dampstain, with some light browning and soiling throughout, but generally clean and crisp; old library stamp on verso of title-page, crossed out with crayon and which has caused a small paper tear; in contemporary tan paste-paper boards, paper label on spine lettered in black, label slightly chipped, head and tail of spine a little worn, with further light scuffing and wear to spine and covers, some light spotting and soiling, extremities a little bumped and worn; still a good copy. Scarce and attractively printed work of factors and prime numbers, published by the noted educator and philosopher Karl Christian Krause (1781-1832). In this, one of…

    (more)

    1804. Small folio, pp. [iv], 22, 28; pp. 21-22 bound upside down; title-page with light dampstain, with some light browning and soiling throughout, but generally clean and crisp; old library stamp on verso of title-page, crossed out with crayon and which has caused a small paper tear; in contemporary tan paste-paper boards, paper label on spine lettered in black, label slightly chipped, head and tail of spine a little worn, with further light scuffing and wear to spine and covers, some light spotting and soiling, extremities a little bumped and worn; still a good copy. Scarce and attractively printed work of factors and prime numbers, published by the noted educator and philosopher Karl Christian Krause (1781-1832). In this, one of his first works, Krause presents a table of 22 pages showing all products <100 000 of two primes, a table of primes <100 000 with letters for 01, 03,..., 99, and (pp. 25-28) a factor table to 10000 by use of letters for numbers <100.
    ‘In his introduction, Krause mentions the tables of Lambert [10] and Felkel [2,3,4,5], and he understands the objections towards the use of letters for numbers which was favoured by Felkel. He nevertheless decided to provide his two short tables, in order to show that letters can be used more conveniently than in Felkel’s table. The main tables in Krause’s book, however, do not use letters. Krause wrote that his tables were computed (neuberechnet), and presumably not copied, although he certainly compared his tables with earlier ones.’ (Roegel, A reconstruction of Krause’s table of factors, p. 3).
    Krause studied philosophy and mathematics at the University of Jena under Fichte and Schelling. He later went to Berlin, Göttingen (where he was one of Schopenhauer’s teachers), and Munich. One of the early natural philosophers, his “Krausismo” philosophical system influenced the theories of Kant and Hegel, and during the 19th century he was regarded as one of the most important of the German philosophers, his system attracting particular attention in France and Spain.

    (less)

    Bibliography: Scarce: Seemingly no copies in the US, with KVK locating copies in Berlin, Coburg, Augsburg and University College, London: a number of digital copies listed in Germany.

    View basket More details Price: £685.00
  • Design for an Underwater Saw
    A PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE ENGINE by LABELYE, Charles.
    LABELYE, Charles.
    A PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE ENGINE made use of for sawing off under water, the Piles which help’d to support the centers, for turning the arches of Westminster Bridge. Most humbly inscrib’d to the Right Honble &c. The Commissioners for building the said Bridge, by the Inventor [in manuscript Willm Etheridge, Carpenter]. Cars: Labelye Delint, P. Fourdrinier Scultp, Published, [in manuscript May 1st] 1745.

    1745. Large copper engraved illustrated broadside, mounted on later paper; mount size 482 x 357mm, engraved surface 455 x 341mm, trimmed to within plate mark; with 7cm tear repaired at top left hand side but without loss of image, engraving a little foxed and soiled, but generally a clean example. As the first major bridge built over an English river for more than a century, and only the second masonry bridge over the Thames, plans for the Westminster Bridge immediately attracted great attention. Though the act of parliament granting building permission was passed in 1736, it was not until May 1738 that the Swiss engineer, architect and mathematician Charles Labelye (1705-1781?) was appointed as “chief engineer”, a move that was…

    (more)

    1745. Large copper engraved illustrated broadside, mounted on later paper; mount size 482 x 357mm, engraved surface 455 x 341mm, trimmed to within plate mark; with 7cm tear repaired at top left hand side but without loss of image, engraving a little foxed and soiled, but generally a clean example. As the first major bridge built over an English river for more than a century, and only the second masonry bridge over the Thames, plans for the Westminster Bridge immediately attracted great attention. Though the act of parliament granting building permission was passed in 1736, it was not until May 1738 that the Swiss engineer, architect and mathematician Charles Labelye (1705-1781?) was appointed as “chief engineer”, a move that was to cause great hostility amongst the unsuccessful English engineers. The initial design was for a timber superstructure with stone piers and abutments. This was abandoned after damage to the works caused by the severe winter of 1739-40, during which the Thames froze solid. All 140 wooden piles were destroyed. So Labelye produced a design for a Portland stone bridge with 13 large semicircular arches and two small, and work recommenced. Though blighted by delays and controversy, and indeed dubbed by some as the 'Bridge of Fools', it eventually received considerable praise for its elegant structure when it opened on November 18th 1750. The Gentleman's Magazine described it as “a very great ornament to our metropolis, and will be looked on with pleasure or envy by all foreigners. The surprising echo in the arches, brings much company with French horns to entertain themselves under it in summer; and with the upper part, for an agreeable airing, none of the publick walks or gardens can stand in competition.” The project in particular is noted for Labelye’s invention of caissons to support the bridge during construction. These were huge boxes built onshore and then floated into position, and then 'sunk until the bottom rested on the bed of the river, a cavity having been previously excavated for their reception. The pier was then built in the caisson, and when it had reached above the level of high water the sides were removed.. The first pile was driven on 13 Sept. 1738, and the first caisson launched on 15 Jan. of the following year..' (DNB).
    At the time of the present engraving, work on the bridge was well underway, though subsidence damage to an arch two years later was to set back the opening for nearly four years. The inventor of the present ‘Engine’ for ‘sawing off under water’, William Etheridge (1709-1776) was a skilled carpenter, engineer and architect from Suffolk, who worked as foreman under the master carpenter, James King, on the project, subsequently replacing him after King’s death in 1744. As well as the underwater saw, Etheridge also invented a battering ram to help strike the centres. He also worked on the Walton Bridge and designed Queens' Bridge in Cambridge. His name and profession has been added by hand to the dedication.

    (less)
    View basket More details Price: £585.00
  • CENT TABLEAUX DE SCIENCE PITTORESQUE by LÉVY, Albert.
    LÉVY, Albert.
    CENT TABLEAUX DE SCIENCE PITTORESQUE Paris, Librairie Hachette et Cie...

    1883. 4to, pp. [iv], [204]; copiously illustrated throughout, each of the 100 chapters illustrated with one full page steel engraving facing the text, and usually a further small engraving within text page; with some occasional light foxing throughout and some faint marginal browning, but otherwise clean and bright; in the original blindstamped decorative green cloth, upper cover lettered in gilt with title within round floral wreath, boards with bevelled edges, head and tail of spine a little bumped and knocked, covers and spine with some minor spotting and scuffing, extremities a little bumped; a very good copy. First edition of this little-known and most attractively produced, late 19th century popular work of science, copiously illustrated with finely executed steel engravings.…

    (more)

    1883. 4to, pp. [iv], [204]; copiously illustrated throughout, each of the 100 chapters illustrated with one full page steel engraving facing the text, and usually a further small engraving within text page; with some occasional light foxing throughout and some faint marginal browning, but otherwise clean and bright; in the original blindstamped decorative green cloth, upper cover lettered in gilt with title within round floral wreath, boards with bevelled edges, head and tail of spine a little bumped and knocked, covers and spine with some minor spotting and scuffing, extremities a little bumped; a very good copy. First edition of this little-known and most attractively produced, late 19th century popular work of science, copiously illustrated with finely executed steel engravings.
    Lévy devotes two pages to each of his chosen one hundred scientific ‘tableaux’, with a page of descriptive text to the left (often with inserted engraving), opposite a striking full-page steel engraving. Somewhat informally organised, he breaks up the volume as it were, into the twelve months of the year, devoting two pates to each month and providing the reader with an insight facts such average temperatures, hours of day-light, associated traditions, festivals, saint’s-day, together with an appealing allegorical plate.
    The work includes for discussion scientific discoveries such as the diffraction of light, those of Torricelli and Archimedes, hot-air balloon flight, and the telescope. Lévy also describes the work of great scientists such as Aristotle, Galileo, Papin, Newton, Pythagoras, Euclid, Copernicus and Descartes. Rather portentously, the penultimate ‘tableaux’ addresses the question whether the end of the world is nigh - though as Lévy notes, various prognostications throughout history have so far come to nothing, and he concludes with the exhortation to ‘banish chimerical fears, leave aside these vain terrors, and let us only occupy ourselves with living well and with dignity’.
    The BnF describe Albert Lévy (1844-1907) as ‘Physicien. - Directeur du service chimique à l'Observatoire de Montsouris (en 1894)’. From 1887 he ran a chemistry course at the Faculty of Science in Clermont, and later worked as a meteorologist at the Montsouris observatory and then in the Central Meteorological Office. He published a number of educational works.

    (less)

    Bibliography: OCLC locates only a small number of copies in the US at Alabama, the Burndy Library, the Huntington, the Smithsonian, Harvard and the British Library.

    View basket More details Price: £400.00
  • VERZEICHNISS DER DOUBLETTEN DES ZOOLOGISCHEN MUSEUMS by LICHTENSTEIN, Martin Heinrich Carl.
    LICHTENSTEIN, Martin Heinrich Carl.
    VERZEICHNISS DER DOUBLETTEN DES ZOOLOGISCHEN MUSEUMS der Königl. Universität zu Berlin nebst Beschreibung vieler bisher unbekannter Arten von Säugethieren, Vögeln, Amphibien und Fischen. Mit 1 terminologischen kupfertafel. Berlin, In commission bei T. Trautwein.

    1823. 4to, pp. x, 118; with one copper engraved plate; printed on poor quality paper, title-page somewhat soiled with repairs to gutter, somewhat browned and lightly foxed throughout, with some marginal soiling, and dampstain affecting upper corner and lower margins and gutter from pp. 109, most prominent on final couple of leaves and affecting plate; with contemporary inscription referring to a genus of grass on front endpaper ‘Calamagrostis Halleriana DC’; uncut, and largely unopened in later blue boards, with red paper label on spine (unlettered), joints rubbed and a little worn, with further scuffing and wear to cover (mainly marginal), with some staining and spotting, extremities a little bumped. Uncommon first edition of this catalogue of duplicate specimens in the…

    (more)

    1823. 4to, pp. x, 118; with one copper engraved plate; printed on poor quality paper, title-page somewhat soiled with repairs to gutter, somewhat browned and lightly foxed throughout, with some marginal soiling, and dampstain affecting upper corner and lower margins and gutter from pp. 109, most prominent on final couple of leaves and affecting plate; with contemporary inscription referring to a genus of grass on front endpaper ‘Calamagrostis Halleriana DC’; uncut, and largely unopened in later blue boards, with red paper label on spine (unlettered), joints rubbed and a little worn, with further scuffing and wear to cover (mainly marginal), with some staining and spotting, extremities a little bumped. Uncommon first edition of this catalogue of duplicate specimens in the Berlin Zoological Museum, including descriptions of new mammals, birds, amphibians and fish, the work of the Museum’s Director Martin Heinrich Carl Lichtenstein (1780-1857). This was the second such descriptive account of the zoological collections published by Lichtenstein, having previously published ‘Das zoologische Museum der Universitat zu Berlin’ in 1816. The present catalogue also includes an annotated engraved plate describing the anatomical regions of a bird.
    Lichtenstein was a German physician, explorer, zoologist, herpetologist, and one of the most important ornithologists of his time. His father, August Heinrich Lichtenstein (1753-1816), professor of theology at Helmstedt, was himself a noted natural historian and zoologist, and author of Catalogus Rerum Naturalium Rarissimarum (1793) and Catalogus Musei zoologici ditissimi Hamburgi (1796). Born at Hamburg, and educated at Jena and Helmstedt, in 1801 Martin accompanied the Dutch General Janssens to South Africa as his family physician and tutor. Before departing he spent a few days with the botanist and insect collector Count van Hoffmannsegg and his staff at Brunswick to acquaint himself with the procedure for collecting and preserving natural history specimens. He arrived at the Cape with the Janssens family in December 1802 and set about collecting information for a comprehensive account of the colony, including its geography, natural history, politics, ethnography and history. Between 1802 and 1806 he travelled extensively in southern Africa, both in a personal capacity, and professionally. He devoted much of his free time to zoology and undertook a number of scientific explorations. When the war against England broke out, he joined the Dutch army as surgeon major to a Light Infantry Battalion, and during the summer of 1804-1805 was involved in combating a deadly epidemic of dysentery among the Dutch troops, his successful treatment of which he later described in a paper in the Hufelands Neues Journal der praktischen Arzneykunde in 1808. Upon his return to Europe, he entrusted his substantial collection of plants and insects to Count J. C. von Hoffmannsegg and to J.C.W. Illiger of Brunswick, who thought that about half of his more than 600 species of insects were new to science. He published an account of his travels and experiences, Reisen im suedlichen Afrika in den Jahren 1803, 1804, 1805 und 1806, in two volumes in 1811-1812, with an English translation, Travels in southern Africa in the years 1803, 1804, 1805 and 1806 appearing in 1812-1815.
    Late in 1810 Lichtenstein began lecturing on zoology at the newly established University of Berlin, where Illiger was professor of Zoology. The university awarded him the honorary degree Doctor of Philosophy and, though he had no formal qualifications in zoology, appointed him as professor of natural history. In 1812 he became temporary director of the university's botanic gardens and when Illiger died the next year he also took over the administration of the Zoological Museum, which by that time had acquired the extensive collection of von Hoffmannsegg. He was an able administrator and was appointed curator of the Zoological Museum in August 1815, and was later responsible for the creation of Berlin’s Zoological Gardens in 1841. He was also accepted as a member of the Berlin Akademie der Wissenschaften, and together with his wife were prominent members of the Berlin Choral Society. Though not considered an outstanding success as an academic he none the less published over 30 papers. His documents and papers are housed in the Staatsbibliothek in Berlin, while most of his correspondence is in the Institut fuer spezielle Zoologie and in the Zoologisches Museum of Humbolt University, Berlin. There are also several collections of his letters in various other German archives and libraries.

    (less)

    Bibliography: See the S2A£ Biographical Database of Southern African Science http://www.s2a3.org.za/bio/Biograph_final.php?serial=1681

    View basket More details Price: £500.00
  • ABREGE HISTORIQUE DES SCIENCES ET DES BEAUX-ARTS by LOS-RIOS, Mademoiselle de, (attributed to Charlotte-Marie).
    LOS-RIOS, Mademoiselle de, (attributed to Charlotte-Marie).
    ABREGE HISTORIQUE DES SCIENCES ET DES BEAUX-ARTS Pour servir de suite à l’Encyclopédie enfantine de Mlle. Los-Rios. A Dresde, chez les Freres Walther.

    1785. 8vo, pp. [iv], 192; with charming engraved title-page vignette, with three-quarter page engraving on final recto, with woodcut head- and tail-pieces and decorative chapter dividers; very faint dampstain at tail of title-page, lightly browned throughout, with some occasional minor spotting and soiling, but otherwise clean and crisp;
    in contemporary half calf over sprinkled boards, retaining the original green silk marker, spines in compartments with raised bands, lettered in blind, covers ruled in blind, small loss to upper cover, extremities and corners lightly rubbed and bumped; an appealing copy. An attractive and scarce example of this work for young readers, as the title-page reveals, ‘intended to serve as a sequel to Mlle. Los-Rios’s Children’s Encyclopaedia’ (originally published in…

    (more)

    1785. 8vo, pp. [iv], 192; with charming engraved title-page vignette, with three-quarter page engraving on final recto, with woodcut head- and tail-pieces and decorative chapter dividers; very faint dampstain at tail of title-page, lightly browned throughout, with some occasional minor spotting and soiling, but otherwise clean and crisp;
    in contemporary half calf over sprinkled boards, retaining the original green silk marker, spines in compartments with raised bands, lettered in blind, covers ruled in blind, small loss to upper cover, extremities and corners lightly rubbed and bumped; an appealing copy. An attractive and scarce example of this work for young readers, as the title-page reveals, ‘intended to serve as a sequel to Mlle. Los-Rios’s Children’s Encyclopaedia’ (originally published in 1770 as ‘Magazine des Petits Enfans).
    Some bibliographical confusion seems to exist over the authorship, L’Encyclopédie enfantine being attributed to both Angelique and Charlotte-Marie Los-Rios, though it may well be that it was a collaborative work. Even some confusion appears to exist over the present title: the Royal Danish Library ascribes it to Charlotte-Marie, but Toronto note a similar title published in 1781 ‘Abrègé historique des sciences et des beaux-arts, en latin et en françois’ and attributed to Abbé Nicolas Dufour. A much longer work, we have so far been able to make a comparison, and so at this point remain unclear as to whether this 1785 edition is a further abridgement, by Los-Rios, of this earlier work. It is nevertheless scarce.
    Divided into 39 chapters, the work adopts the popular question and answer format, and provides a brief introduction into topics such as printing, grammar, metaphysics, geography, chronology, history, arithmetic, geometry, navigation, astronomy, painting, sculpture, anatomy, chemistry, music, dance, commerce, and concluding with a short section on heraldry, including a small engraved image explaining the design of a coat-of-arms.
    From a family of printers, Charlotte Marie de Los-Rios (nee Mesplet, 1726-1802) married the noted and colourful Lyons bookseller, Jean-Francois de Los Rios in 1760. Her father was a printer in Lyon, her uncle was the noted Avignon printer Francois-Prothade Girard, and her brother Fleury Mesple, founded the first Canadian newspaper.

    (less)

    Bibliography: OCLC locates copies of this edition at the Royal Danish Library only; Yale holds a copy of a 1789 Lausanne reprint which they note as being a translation of Abbé Dufour’s work of 1781.

    View basket More details Price: £550.00
  • COMPENDIUM OF THE LIGAMENTS; by M’NAB. [MACNAB], Alexander.
    M’NAB. [MACNAB], Alexander.
    COMPENDIUM OF THE LIGAMENTS; Illustrated by woodcuts. With the articular cartilages, interarticular or moveable fibro-cartilages, synovial membranes, and bursæ mucosæ of the joints; The mode of union, and the bones entering into the formation of each; and an outline of the dislocations, fractures, physiology, and pathology. London: Published by Henry Renshaw, Medical bookseller, 356, Strand, near King’s College. 1835.

    1835. Small 8vo, pp. viii, 86, with a number of small woodcuts; title page a little soiled with some light paper abrasion at upper margin, lightly browned throughout, particularly at margins; uncut in the original green pebble-grained cloth, with printed paper label on upper cover (somewhat soiled), and remains of paper label along spine, joints and head and tail of spine neatly repaired. First edition of this uncommon introduction to the fibrous structures in particular, by Alexander M’Nab, Jun ‘Member of the Royal College of Surgeons, London’. According to the preface, Macnab has drawn upon more ‘voluminous works’, and hopes that his abridged compilation will provide a more accessible work for those ‘unable to conveniently to peruse more elaborate productions’.…

    (more)

    1835. Small 8vo, pp. viii, 86, with a number of small woodcuts; title page a little soiled with some light paper abrasion at upper margin, lightly browned throughout, particularly at margins; uncut in the original green pebble-grained cloth, with printed paper label on upper cover (somewhat soiled), and remains of paper label along spine, joints and head and tail of spine neatly repaired. First edition of this uncommon introduction to the fibrous structures in particular, by Alexander M’Nab, Jun ‘Member of the Royal College of Surgeons, London’. According to the preface, Macnab has drawn upon more ‘voluminous works’, and hopes that his abridged compilation will provide a more accessible work for those ‘unable to conveniently to peruse more elaborate productions’. The woodcuts are apparently by ‘Mr Berryman’, and although as far as we can tell, Macnab makes no direction citation from other works, he does refer to case histories as described by physicians both in England, Europe and America, including ‘Dr. Kirkbride, resident physician of the Pennsylvania Hospital’, (p. 22) ‘Dr. Warren of Boston’ (p. 23), Dupuytren (p. 23), Bichat (p. 56) Delpech (p. 65) and ‘Mr. Hunter’ (p. 62) as well as a number of cases highlighted in the Medical Gazette.

    (less)

    Bibliography: OCLC locates copies at the British Library, Cambridge, Oxford, Aberdeen, the NLM and the College of Physicians.

    View basket More details Price: £285.00
  • DESCRIPTION DES MOEURS, USAGES ET COUTUMES DE TOUS LES PEUPLES DU MONDE, by [MANNERS AND CUSTOMS.]
    [MANNERS AND CUSTOMS.]
    DESCRIPTION DES MOEURS, USAGES ET COUTUMES DE TOUS LES PEUPLES DU MONDE, contenant une foule d'Anecdotes sur les Sauvages d'Afrique, d'Amérique, les Anthropophages, hommes de Cuivre, Hottentots, Caraïbes, Patagons, habitans des Terres de Feu, Samoïédes et autres; sur les animaux monstrueux, amphibies, et autres prodiges de l'univers. Seconde Édition, entièrement refondue, augmentée de divers extraits de Voyages, et adaptée a l’usage de la jeunesse; accompagnée de douze jolies gravures en couleur. Tome premier [-Tome Second.] A Paris, Chez Salmon, Libraire...

    1825. Two volumes, 12mo; pp. vi, 248, with five hand-coloured engraved plates; pp. 250 (though 248 as no pp. 156-7 through pagination error), with seven uncoloured engraved plates; some light foxing and spotting throughout, with some occasional marginal tears, lower corner of p. 141 in Vol. I torn with loss; in the original green printed paper wrappers, with waste-paper pastedowns, head and tail of both spines lightly worn with slight loss, upper joint of Vol. 1 split and a little fragile but holding, with further light cracking to spine, some light spotting and soiling to covers, extremities a little dog-eared, but overall an appealing, unsophisticated copy. Second expanded edition (first 1821) in the original printed wrappers, of this attractively illustrated…

    (more)

    1825. Two volumes, 12mo; pp. vi, 248, with five hand-coloured engraved plates; pp. 250 (though 248 as no pp. 156-7 through pagination error), with seven uncoloured engraved plates; some light foxing and spotting throughout, with some occasional marginal tears, lower corner of p. 141 in Vol. I torn with loss; in the original green printed paper wrappers, with waste-paper pastedowns, head and tail of both spines lightly worn with slight loss, upper joint of Vol. 1 split and a little fragile but holding, with further light cracking to spine, some light spotting and soiling to covers, extremities a little dog-eared, but overall an appealing, unsophisticated copy. Second expanded edition (first 1821) in the original printed wrappers, of this attractively illustrated work for young children, introducing them to the manners, customs, wonders, and curiosities of the nations of the world - an uncommon contribution to what was an extremely popular genre at the beginning of the 19th century, which saw many such elementary illustrated works introducing readers to the geographical world.
    Very much of its time, the racial stereotyping and fascination with foreign civilisations makes for somewhat uncomfortable reading today, but nevertheless highlights early 19th European perceptions of the world. Tome I deals with Europe and the Far East, and includes five hand-coloured plates. Tome II, in this instance uncoloured, points the reader towards Asia, Africa, and with a detailed section on North and South America, and including depictions’ of Native Americans, Native Canadians, and Native Californians.
    The work first appeared in 1821, and according to the copy at the BnF was ascribed on the title-page ‘Par P.C.’ - though they give no suggestion as to the author’s identity. Of interest, the imprint for the 1821 edition was ‘Chez Lécrivain’. No initials are given in this second, revised edition, here published by Salmon. The BnF also hold another variant copy, undated and with the publisher imprint of Roret, but bearing the same collation.

    (less)

    Bibliography: Not in Gumunchian.

    View basket More details Price: £425.00
  • Mid 18th century French sailor’s personal service book
    ‘LIVRET POUR LES MATELOTS’ by [MARITIME REGISTRATION.]
    [MARITIME REGISTRATION.]
    ‘LIVRET POUR LES MATELOTS’ title taken from upper wrapper. n.p. but France, [n.d. but ca.

    1788.]. Small 8vo, pp. 72, [14] blank; pre-printed service or record book to be completed; title-page filled in in a contemporary hand in brown ink, otherwise unused, aside from some doodling on p. 46-7, 66-7, and in pencil on p. 71-72, with the first four final blank leaves ruled in pencil to form a grid, and which has been used; contemporary stiff vellum with closing fore-edge envelope flap, retaining part of the closing cord, title in manuscript (?) in black on upper cover, with small royal arms in black at centre of rear cover, some small wormholes evident in spine, covers somewhat soiled, with small loss of vellum to envelope flap edge; a little dog-eared but an unusual survivor. A…

    (more)

    1788.]. Small 8vo, pp. 72, [14] blank; pre-printed service or record book to be completed; title-page filled in in a contemporary hand in brown ink, otherwise unused, aside from some doodling on p. 46-7, 66-7, and in pencil on p. 71-72, with the first four final blank leaves ruled in pencil to form a grid, and which has been used; contemporary stiff vellum with closing fore-edge envelope flap, retaining part of the closing cord, title in manuscript (?) in black on upper cover, with small royal arms in black at centre of rear cover, some small wormholes evident in spine, covers somewhat soiled, with small loss of vellum to envelope flap edge; a little dog-eared but an unusual survivor. A scarce survivor, a pre-printed personal service record book belonging to Jean-Bernard Bouën, born in Verdun in 1767, and who became a classified or registered ‘gens de mer’ on in 1787.
    During the 17th century, several seafaring nations used forced recruitment or impressment (better known as ‘press-ganging’) to crew their Royal warships. Although the British Royal Navy continued to impress many merchant sailors well into the 19th century, in 1669-70 France created a system of maritime registration or ‘L’Institution du service des classes’, under the auspices of Louis XIV’s minister of finances Jean-Baptiste Colbert (1619-1683), thus becoming the first of the great naval powers to establish a permanent force of regular navy personnel. All men 18 years and above, who lived in or near coastal towns, and who were employed as fishermen, merchant crewmen and officers, were required to register on the rôle des gens de mer, and were divided into ‘classes’, each of which was required to serve a year in the King’s Navy every three, four or five years depending on the size of the district. This ‘inscription maritime’ was a broad, comprehensive code, which established standards of recruitment, pay, and benefits which in theory helped to build confidence and unity among newly enlisted sailors. ‘The navy maintained seamen not needed to commission warships during their year of service, theoretically, on half-pay: however, they were forbidden to sign on merchant ships. The Crown gave “classed” men various privileges in return for this perpetual commitment: exemption from certain taxes... and eligibility to receive money from the Caisse des invalides, a royal fund for invalid seamen or the families of those lost at sea.’ (Cormack, p. 23). Each coastal province was overseen by a class commissionaire, who kept a record of whether they were officers, sailors, or seafarers, together with names, age, address, qualities and description of the registrant, as well as keeping a record of any dependants. As Cormack goes on to discuss however, although this ‘class system’ was intended to place all of the maritime population at the navy’s disposal, it was constantly unable to supply crews needed for the commissioning of warships throughout the 18th century. He cites a number of possible reasons for this. Many preferred to work for privateers, whilst the mortality rate for sailors on long voyages was also high. The French navy was also frequently unable to pay its crews, and so consequently, many seamen did all that they could to resist conscription or to desert. The system was eventually reformed after the French Revolution in 1795, although some form of maritime inscription lasted until 1965.
    The survival of such personal record books, by their very nature, appears to be unusual, no doubt potentially exposed to all weathers and conditions. Pierre Loti, in his work Le Matelot of 1893, includes a paragraph referring to a similar notebook: ‘Le livret de marin de mon frère Yves ressemble à tous les autres livrets de tous les autres marins. Il est recouvert d'un papier parchemin de couleur jaune, et, comme il a beaucoup voyagé sur la mer, dans différents caissons de navires, il manque absolument de fraîcheur’.
    The booklet is divided into three sections. The first template page provides space for the owner to give their own details. This is followed by the ‘Instruction sur les devoirs des gens classés, leurs exemptions & privilèges’, according to recent reforms set into law on October 31st 1784. The remainder of the note book provides space to detail the owner’s various assignments, commissions on Royal vessels, and on other authorised voyages and navigation's.
    For whatever reason, Bouën has filled in very little of his notebook, aside from his own personal details, and what appears to be the name of a vessel on p. 66. A number of the blank leaves at the end have been used, completed in pencil to form a grid of some sort, and which we have failed to decipher - although some look suspiciously like the doodling of a young child. Having signed up only two years before the start of the Revolution, it seems quite possible that larger events overtook him. Nevertheless, a scarce and appealing example from the last days of the Ancien Regime.

    (less)

    Bibliography: See Cormack, Revolution and Political Conflict in the French Navy, 1789-1794, p. 23.

    View basket More details Price: £800.00
  • MENU CARD IN THE SHAPE OF A SKULL FOR THE ‘SECOND ANNUAL BANQUET OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA CHAPTER, by [MEMENTO MORI.] [PENNSYLVANIA MEDICAL FRATERNITY.]
    [MEMENTO MORI.] [PENNSYLVANIA MEDICAL FRATERNITY.]
    MENU CARD IN THE SHAPE OF A SKULL FOR THE ‘SECOND ANNUAL BANQUET OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA CHAPTER, Alpha Mu Pi Omega, Medical Fraternity’, at the Art Club in Phildelphia on May 3,

    1892. Drawn and printed on card in the shape of a skull, ff. 4; front cover seemingly in manuscript in pen and ink, followed by two leaves of printed text including menu, lists of toasts, and ‘In Memoriam’, with final blank leaf signed on both sides by all participants in pencil or ink; evidence of previous mount on back cover, with some minor staining and creasing in places, otherwise very good; held together by mauve and yellow ribbon. A wonderful piece of medical ephemera, relating to one of the early fraternities at the University of Pennsylvania. Founded in January 1891, this striking privately printed menu card was produced for the second annual dinner of the ‘Alpha Mu Pi Omega’ medical…

    (more)

    1892. Drawn and printed on card in the shape of a skull, ff. 4; front cover seemingly in manuscript in pen and ink, followed by two leaves of printed text including menu, lists of toasts, and ‘In Memoriam’, with final blank leaf signed on both sides by all participants in pencil or ink; evidence of previous mount on back cover, with some minor staining and creasing in places, otherwise very good; held together by mauve and yellow ribbon. A wonderful piece of medical ephemera, relating to one of the early fraternities at the University of Pennsylvania. Founded in January 1891, this striking privately printed menu card was produced for the second annual dinner of the ‘Alpha Mu Pi Omega’ medical fraternity. The front cover appears to have been executed by hand in pen and ink (possibly by a member of the Art Club?), and is followed by the printed menu, list of toasts, and brief list of ‘Our departed Members’.
    Participating members at the banquet include: Samuel D. Risley (toast master, signed); William E. Robertson (one of the founding members and a speaker, signed); Frederick Wilson (one of the founding members, signed); Aaron M. Billstein (one of the founding members, signed); Harrison Allen (speaker, signed); James F. Leys (speaker, signed); James B. Walker (speaker, signed); Sydney M. Cone (speaker, signed); with a further 22 signatures, including those of other founding members such as Arthur J. Patek.

    (less)
    View basket More details Price: £875.00
  • on epidemiology, and containing remarks on the plague
    PRAELECTIONES PISANAE by MERCURIALE, Girolamo.
    MERCURIALE, Girolamo.
    PRAELECTIONES PISANAE In Epidemicas Hippocratis Historias, non minus ad theoricam, atque practicam medicinam utiles, quàm ab eruditionem iucundae. Nec non tractatus [brace] Primò, De hominis generatione. Secondò, de balneis Pisanis. Tertiò, De vino & aqua [end of bracketed section]. Cum Indice copioso eaorum que in his operibus continentur. Venice: apud Iuntas,

    1597. Folio, 318 x 215mm, pp. [16] 208, 56, [4,] 11 [3] blank, Roman letter in double columns with italic headings; brown stain in upper-inner corners extending into the text in some leaves; first few leaves worn in corners and foremargin where binding is damaged; small wormholes in outer margins towards the end; headline on last leaf shaved; sheet K3.4 browned; contemporary limp vellum, corners and upper foredge worn away, spine cracked across in one place, somewhat soiled, ties lacking; with the signature ‘Octaviani Galleppini I: C:, et Nob: Foros[?]’ on title and 16 marginal annotations, about 120 words in all in the last section (perhaps in a different hand). First edition of this collection of lectures given by Mercuriale…

    (more)

    1597. Folio, 318 x 215mm, pp. [16] 208, 56, [4,] 11 [3] blank, Roman letter in double columns with italic headings; brown stain in upper-inner corners extending into the text in some leaves; first few leaves worn in corners and foremargin where binding is damaged; small wormholes in outer margins towards the end; headline on last leaf shaved; sheet K3.4 browned; contemporary limp vellum, corners and upper foredge worn away, spine cracked across in one place, somewhat soiled, ties lacking; with the signature ‘Octaviani Galleppini I: C:, et Nob: Foros[?]’ on title and 16 marginal annotations, about 120 words in all in the last section (perhaps in a different hand). First edition of this collection of lectures given by Mercuriale (1530-1606) at the University of Pisa, and notably on Hippocrates’ Epidemiorum, and including the text of the cases from books 1 and 3. The volume also contains Mercurale’s remarks on the plague as well as three shorter lectures on conception, the baths and mineral waters of Pisa (second section pp. 1–56), and the medicinal virtues of wine and water. The book was edited by Marco and Orazio Cornacchini.
    The main work is dedicated to Ferdinand de Medici. The appended section, possibly printed later as it follows the register and colophon on 2E4v, is addressed to Gian Vincenzo Pinelli of Padua, the great book collector and patron of modern learning. It prints the text of lectures given in Bologna and a Tractatus de Vino et Aqua. Interestingly it is this treatise on wine and water that is the only part of the work annotated by the contemporary owner of this copy.
    The work seems to have been widely used in England, with surviving copies at Merton College and in the Bodleian in Oxford; Trinity, Clare and Caius Colleges in Cambridge; and it was present in the library of the Royal College of Physicians in 1660.
    Mercuriale (1530–1606), professor of medicine at Pisa and Bologna, is today best known for his work on gymnastics and the importance of exercise for health, first published in 1569. The last gathering is unsigned (in some copies it is signed *, (see Adams).

    (less)

    Bibliography: Adams M133; Bruni Celli 2952; Heirs of Hippocrates 360; Wellcome 4249; Durling 3107.

    View basket More details Price: £2,250.00
  • LES MÉDECINS À LA CENSURE by [MOLIERE.] BEZANÇON, Germain de.
    [MOLIERE.] BEZANÇON, Germain de.
    LES MÉDECINS À LA CENSURE ou entretiens sur la medecine. A Paris, Chez Louis Gontier, Libraire Juré, sur le Quay des Augustins, à l’image S. Barbe, proche l’Hostel de Luynes.

    1677. 12mo, pp. [xii], 370, [2]; with small printer’s device on title-page signed ‘DF’, and woodcut head-pieces and initials; small wormhole in lower outer margin running from title-page to p. 190, with some occasional minor spotting and soiling; contemporary calf, spine in compartments with raised bands, ruled and lettered in gilt, with red sprinkled edges, head and tail of spine chipped and worn, exposing headbands at head, upper joint split at tail, covers a little scuffed, corners worn; contemporary bookseller’s ticket of Laurent d’Houry, Paris, on front pastedown, contemporary ownership inscription on front free endpaper, and later bookplate of Dr. J. Pyenneville, Rouen. First edition of this series of philosophical dialogues between Cariste, a cleric and advocate, Cleante, a gentleman,…

    (more)

    1677. 12mo, pp. [xii], 370, [2]; with small printer’s device on title-page signed ‘DF’, and woodcut head-pieces and initials; small wormhole in lower outer margin running from title-page to p. 190, with some occasional minor spotting and soiling; contemporary calf, spine in compartments with raised bands, ruled and lettered in gilt, with red sprinkled edges, head and tail of spine chipped and worn, exposing headbands at head, upper joint split at tail, covers a little scuffed, corners worn; contemporary bookseller’s ticket of Laurent d’Houry, Paris, on front pastedown, contemporary ownership inscription on front free endpaper, and later bookplate of Dr. J. Pyenneville, Rouen. First edition of this series of philosophical dialogues between Cariste, a cleric and advocate, Cleante, a gentleman, and Sosandre, a well-known doctor. Inspired by, and indeed citing the works of Molière, most notably ‘Tartuffe’ and his ‘Malade Imaginaire’ (during a performance of which in 1673 Moliere fell ill and later died), the three main protagonists partake in a series of satirical exchanges during which Sosandre defends his profession. The author Bezancon, himself a physician and the author of two further works, insists that he is no apologist for medicine, however, and that the reader must decide for themselves whether Sosandre’s replies are reasonable. A number of philosophers, both ancient and modern, are cites throughout including Montaigne and de Thou.
    The work was translated into Italian in the following year.

    (less)

    Bibliography: Guibert Bibliographie des Oeuvres de Molière, II. p. 810, n. 76;Wellcome II, p. 161; Krivatsy 1227; Waller 1023; Cioranescu 12057.

    View basket More details Price: £450.00
  • How to Prevent hospital cross-infection
    INTRODUCTORY NOTES ON LYING-IN INSTITUTIONS. by NIGHTINGALE, Florence.
    NIGHTINGALE, Florence.
    INTRODUCTORY NOTES ON LYING-IN INSTITUTIONS. Together with a proposal for organising an Institution for Training Midwives and midwifery nurses. London: Longmans, Green, and Co.

    1871. 8vo, pp. xvi, 10; with fiven engraved architectural plans (one folding), and smaller plans within text, and numerous statistical tables; a number of early preliminary leaves discretely strengthened at gutter; lightly browned throughout, a couple of the plates slightly shaved along fore-edge clipping a couple of letters; ex-libris from Battersea Public Library, with their stamp on verso of plates, and at head of p. 1, tail of p. 99, and on final leaf; in modern black cloth, with red morocco label lettered in gilt on spine; with later book-plate of Margaret Yvonne Williams mounted on verso of title-page. First edition of this rare volume. In 1860 Nightingale laid the foundation of professional nursing with the establishment of her nursing…

    (more)

    1871. 8vo, pp. xvi, 10; with fiven engraved architectural plans (one folding), and smaller plans within text, and numerous statistical tables; a number of early preliminary leaves discretely strengthened at gutter; lightly browned throughout, a couple of the plates slightly shaved along fore-edge clipping a couple of letters; ex-libris from Battersea Public Library, with their stamp on verso of plates, and at head of p. 1, tail of p. 99, and on final leaf; in modern black cloth, with red morocco label lettered in gilt on spine; with later book-plate of Margaret Yvonne Williams mounted on verso of title-page. First edition of this rare volume. In 1860 Nightingale laid the foundation of professional nursing with the establishment of her nursing school at St Thomas’ Hospital in London. It was the first secular nursing school in the world, now part of King’s College London. The following year Nightingale secured funding to train midwives for service among the poor, and arranged for suitable young women to receive six months practical training in midwifery by professional physician-accoucheurs. This training programme continued for six years but was abandoned after an epidemic of puerperal fever – the greatest post-natal killer of the nineteenth century. A vicious and usually fatal form of septicaemia, puerperal or childbed fever was known to occur in maternity hospitals far more frequently than at home births, and to spread faster in crowded wards than in those with fewer patients. Its cause was unknown.
    Already interested in hospital design, this unfortunately event, along with the discovery that no trustworthy statistics of mortality of ‘lying-in institutions’ existed, prompted Nightingale to embark on gathering the facts presented in the current rare volume. From 1868 she constantly badgered Douglas Galton, Sutherland, Farr and many others to obtain the necessary facts and data to produce this, the most detailed work on the subject to have been published up to that time. In this precise statistical analysis of the facts, gathered from several sources across the major cites of Europe, Nightingale explores the mystery of puerperal fever and its possible causes. The work discusses the maternal death statistics of lying-in institutions and makes suggestions, with accompanying plans, for changes to hospital layouts to help prevent cross-infection between patients, and thus reduce maternal deaths, in particular stressing the necessity of good ventilation and condemning those hospitals with overcrowded wards. Published in 1871, just before Pasteur’s work on germ theory proved that the problem could be all but eradicated if doctors washed their hands more rigourously, this work remains clear, scholarly and engaging, and was widely well received, and proved instrument in helping popularise the graphical presentation of statistical data.

    (less)

    Bibliography: Bishop & Goldie, Bio-Bibliography of Florence Nightingale, 102.

    View basket More details Price: £2,200.00
  • THE ILLUSTRATED COLLEGE HERBAL. by OAKELEY, Henry, Jane KNOWLES and Gillian BARLOW.
    OAKELEY, Henry, Jane KNOWLES and Gillian BARLOW.
    THE ILLUSTRATED COLLEGE HERBAL. Plants from the Pharmacopoea Londinensis of 1618. www.oakeleybooks. com. May

    2018. Large 4to; Celebrating the 500th Anniversary of the College and the 400th Anniversary of the College’s Pharmacopoea Londinensis – the first pharmacopoeia to be manadatory for the whole country; hardback. This book contains specially commissioned paintings and drawings, and late medieval woodcuts, of nearly 200 plants growing in the Medicinal Garden of the Royal College of Physicians of London which were ingredients in the College’s Pharmacopoea Londinensis of 1618. Their contemporary uses are given from the publications of Nicholas Culpeper in 1649 and John Parkinson in 1640. The 17th century names of the 634 medicinal plants used in the Pharmacopoea have been painstakingly identified and listed with their modern botanical names – an invaluable resource for all interested in…

    (more)

    2018. Large 4to; Celebrating the 500th Anniversary of the College and the 400th Anniversary of the College’s Pharmacopoea Londinensis – the first pharmacopoeia to be manadatory for the whole country; hardback. This book contains specially commissioned paintings and drawings, and late medieval woodcuts, of nearly 200 plants growing in the Medicinal Garden of the Royal College of Physicians of London which were ingredients in the College’s Pharmacopoea Londinensis of 1618. Their contemporary uses are given from the publications of Nicholas Culpeper in 1649 and John Parkinson in 1640. The 17th century names of the 634 medicinal plants used in the Pharmacopoea have been painstakingly identified and listed with their modern botanical names – an invaluable resource for all interested in the history of plant-based medicine. The artists directory is included for all who seek commissions from them.
    Hardback, 224 pages, 325 x 230mm. ISBN: 978-0-9521461-7-9.

    (less)
    View basket More details Price: £35.00
  • Rare orthopaedic treatise with 30 lithograph plates
    ESSAI ET OBSERVATIONS SUR LA MANIÈRE DE RÉDUIRE LES LUXATIONS by [ORTHOPAEDICS]. HUMBERT, François, and M.N. JACQUIER.
    [ORTHOPAEDICS]. HUMBERT, François, and M.N. JACQUIER.
    ESSAI ET OBSERVATIONS SUR LA MANIÈRE DE RÉDUIRE LES LUXATIONS spontanées ou symptomatiques de l’articulation ilio-fémorale; méthode applicable aux luxations congénitales et aux luxations anciennes par cause externe. Bar-Le-Duc: Chez F. Gigault D’Olincourt... [&] Paris: Chez J.B. Baillière...

    1835. Two volumes, 8vo text and large 4to atlas; pp. xiii, viii, 554; pp. [viii], and 30 lithographed plates (4 anatomical and 26 of apparatus, the latter accompanied by 15 leaves of explanation); some minor spotting to text with occasional marginal dampstaining, atlas volume a little foxed and browned; in modern quarter blue straight-grained morocco, preserving the original printed wrappers to the text bound in, spines in compartments ruled and lettered in gilt, spines a little sunned, extremities lightly rubbed and bumped, minor wear to boards; a very good copy. Rare first edition. Humbert was the first to make any progress on a problem unsolved since antiquity — reduction of a dislocation of the hip. Taking advantage of the latest…

    (more)

    1835. Two volumes, 8vo text and large 4to atlas; pp. xiii, viii, 554; pp. [viii], and 30 lithographed plates (4 anatomical and 26 of apparatus, the latter accompanied by 15 leaves of explanation); some minor spotting to text with occasional marginal dampstaining, atlas volume a little foxed and browned; in modern quarter blue straight-grained morocco, preserving the original printed wrappers to the text bound in, spines in compartments ruled and lettered in gilt, spines a little sunned, extremities lightly rubbed and bumped, minor wear to boards; a very good copy. Rare first edition. Humbert was the first to make any progress on a problem unsolved since antiquity — reduction of a dislocation of the hip. Taking advantage of the latest information on the anatomy of the hip presented by Dupuytren and Vrolik, Humbert developed manipulative techniques which he claimed succeeded in reducing both congenital and pathological dislocations in brief sessions. While successors such as Pravaz and Gerdy considered that he achieved a transposition and not a true reduction, both acknowledged that his innovative work was the impetus to the successful reductions achieved by Pravaz in the 1840s. “Humbert was one of the first who tried to correct congenital dislocations of the hip without operation. His book on this procedure (published together with Jacquier) and his other works are adorned with excellent, precisely detailed construction drawings of the apparatus invented by him...” (Valentin, Geschichte der Orthopädie, 120–121 and 205–206, in translation).
    This rare book is unusual and elegant both in its typography and illustration. Four of the plates illustrate the hip, and the remainder show precise details of the apparatus that Humbert and Jacquier devised. Humbert, who described himself as a “médecin-orthopédiste” opened one of the first orthopaedic establishments in France, preceded only by Delpech. Humbert founded the first orthopaedic hospital in France in 1817, and invented extension beds and chairs, and an instrument to measure changes produced by spinal curvatures.

    (less)

    Bibliography: OCLC locates copies at Harvard, NLM, Minnesota, Rochester, Pennsylvania, Chicago, the British Library.

    View basket More details Price: £1,400.00
  • AN ILLUSTRATION OF OSBOURNE'S PICTORIAL ALPHABET by OSBOURNE, Charles and Henry Wallis (engraver).
    OSBOURNE, Charles and Henry Wallis (engraver).
    AN ILLUSTRATION OF OSBOURNE'S PICTORIAL ALPHABET Entered at Stationer’s Hall. London: Published by C. Osbourne, Sen., and sold by all the Booksellers in the Kingdom. Price Ten shillings and sixpence. [added in mss- In Boards 13/6].

    1847. Oblong folio, 282 x 391mm; ff. [vi], title-page, dedication to Queen Victoria, and list of illustrations, followed by four leaves of thin card on which have been steel engraved title card, blank presentation card, and 26 steel engraved letters of the alphabet; each leaf, including text leaves, retaining original tissue guard, though somewhat creased and foxed in places, with a number of marginal tears; title-page with some marginal browning and soiling, with further light soiling, foxing and spotting throughout, the first blank leaf considerable creased nicked and torn with loss along upper margin; in the original limp dark green thin card wrappers, with possibly later green cloth spine back, inner hinges cracked but holding, head and tail of spine…

    (more)

    1847. Oblong folio, 282 x 391mm; ff. [vi], title-page, dedication to Queen Victoria, and list of illustrations, followed by four leaves of thin card on which have been steel engraved title card, blank presentation card, and 26 steel engraved letters of the alphabet; each leaf, including text leaves, retaining original tissue guard, though somewhat creased and foxed in places, with a number of marginal tears; title-page with some marginal browning and soiling, with further light soiling, foxing and spotting throughout, the first blank leaf considerable creased nicked and torn with loss along upper margin; in the original limp dark green thin card wrappers, with possibly later green cloth spine back, inner hinges cracked but holding, head and tail of spine lightly worn, some light surface and extremities wear; The scarce landscape folio edition of a previously issued set of attractively steel engraved alphabet cards, and which first appeared in 1835. Each letter of the alphabet has been hidden within an ornately designed classical or mythological scene, and designed by Charles Osbourne when he was sixteen years of age, and were then engraved by Henry Wallis (c. 1805-1890).
    Sold originally as a small boxed set of cards 76 x 76mm, together with an accompanying booklet providing a description together with some poetic extracts, the engravings are here printed on four sheets, and include the original title-card, a blank ‘Presentation Card’. For ‘A’ we see ‘Cupid in the Act of bending his Bow’; ‘G - A Greek Galley, on the River Tiber, with Troops on Board’; ‘I - Ancient Forum at Rome, Trojans Column’; ‘N - A Bearer of the Imperial Roman Eagle, wounded, leaning on his Spear’; ‘U - A View of Tivoli’; and ‘Z - Death’. The edition is once again dedicated to Queen Victoria (though who had in 1835 still been Princess Alexandrina Victoria).
    Another issue of the boxed cards was released in 1839 (and previously handled by us), and auction records note a further version of 1843 in which the letters had been mounted on thin card of different colours within wide embossed borders, and with a dedication to Prince Albert and bound in velvet covered boards (and now at Toronto). Other copies cited note the booklet having been printed in a variety of colours. Clearly an entrepreneurial man, or perhaps out of necessity, the present landscape folio version appeared four years later, although only we have so far located only one other copy at the V & A.
    The London Gazette of 1838 (p. 778) gives some clue as to the possible explanation for Osbourne’s dogged attempts to sell his work. It transpires that he had recently appeared before the Warwick County Court and had ended up in the debtor’s prison. He is described as being formerly: 'General Dealer and Manager of the Magna Charta Steam Packet' in Hull, 'General Merchant' in Liverpool, 'Vendor of the Pictorial Alphabet',elsewhere in Liverpool, 'General Dealer' while lodging at multiple addresses in Middlesex, and most recently a lodger in Leamington, and 'out of business'. The imprint on this edition adds the suffix ‘Sen.’ after ‘C. Osbourne’ - though whether this means that he had now become a father himself, or that perhaps his own father was helping him to clear his debts, we have no way of knowing.
    The engravings are by Henry Wallis (c.1805-1890): brother to Robert and William Wallis, both also engravers (Robert particularly associated with Turner), he suffered attacks of paralysis and had to give up engraving, becoming a picture dealer instead and running a successful gallery in Pall Mall.

    (less)

    Bibliography: Muir, Children’s Books of Yesterday, item 24, p. 11 for a set of the boxed cards; OCLC notes only the V & A for this 1847 edition; all copies of the cards now rare, with OCLC noting copies at the V&A, the BL, British Columbia and at the Osbourne Collection at Toronto (three of which appear to be incomplete).

    View basket More details Price: £1,200.00
  • VON DER BERGKRANKHEITEN DREY BÜCHER, by PARACELSUS.
    PARACELSUS.
    VON DER BERGKRANKHEITEN DREY BÜCHER, [in]. FÜNFFER THEIL DER BÜCHER UND SCHRIFFTEN des Edlen Hochgelehrten und Bewehrten Philosophi und Medici, Philippi Theophrasti Bombast von Hohenheim Paracelsi genannt: Jetzt auffs neue auß den originialien und Theophrasti eigner handschrifft... durch Johannem Huserum Brisgoium. Getruckt zu Basel durch Conrad Waldkirch.

    1589. Two parts in one volume, 4to, pp. [viii] including frontispiece portrait coloured in a contemporary hand, 332; Appendix, 176, [iv], 179-228, [50]; title printed in red and black; with woodcut initials, mostly in Gothic letter with a few passages in Roman or Italic, fore-edge of title-page reinforced and strengthened, and portrait leaf also repaired (where stamp previously excised?) and reinforced with Japanese paper, lightly browned throughout with some occasional faint marginal dampstaining, small worm trail from pp. 189 of Part II through to the end, touching letters but without significant loss, some unobtrusive marginal annotations in blue and red throughout with some neat mss pagination corrections in a couple of places; recased in contemporary vellum boards seemingly taken from…

    (more)

    1589. Two parts in one volume, 4to, pp. [viii] including frontispiece portrait coloured in a contemporary hand, 332; Appendix, 176, [iv], 179-228, [50]; title printed in red and black; with woodcut initials, mostly in Gothic letter with a few passages in Roman or Italic, fore-edge of title-page reinforced and strengthened, and portrait leaf also repaired (where stamp previously excised?) and reinforced with Japanese paper, lightly browned throughout with some occasional faint marginal dampstaining, small worm trail from pp. 189 of Part II through to the end, touching letters but without significant loss, some unobtrusive marginal annotations in blue and red throughout with some neat mss pagination corrections in a couple of places; recased in contemporary vellum boards seemingly taken from another book (ré-emboîtage), with later endpapers, remains of library stamp on title-page, covers browned and stained, remains of previous ties; despite faults, a good, crisp copy. Second corrected and improved edition of Paracelsus’s book on the diseases of miners (first 1567), and the first monograph on the diseases of an occupation group. The present edition is found within the fifth volume of the Basel publisher Johann Huser’s German quarto edition of the collected medical and philosophical works, published in ten volumes between 1589-1591, and considered by many to be the definitive edition. Huser did not confine himself to including the early printed copies only, but collected all the manuscripts which he could procure, and used them in forming his text. As a result the collection includes many non-genuine writings. According to Sudhof, Huser corrected and enlarged the work on miner’s diseases, adding two chapters taken from original manuscripts.
    'The year 1533 found [Paracelsus] in the land of Appenzell -- a poor lay preacher and healer among poor Swiss peasants. In the same year he visited the mining districts of Hall and Schwaz. Here his work on the Miners' diseases was conceived and written -- the first treatise in medical literature recognising and systematically dealing with an occupational disease' (Pagel, p. 26). The first section covers miners' diseases, mainly pulmonary affections such as silicosis and tuberculosis which Paracelsus was the first to identify as occupational hazards. The second book describes the diseases of smelters and metallurgists, and the third diseases caused by mercury. 'The treatise on miners' diseases, the result of his observations in Fugger's mines in Tyrol, containing descriptions of miners' phthisis and the effects of choke-damp, was one of the few original contributions of the time to clinical medicine.' (Garrison, History of medicine, p. 407). Although written around 1533 the book remained unpublished until the 1567 posthumous printing, edited by Samuel Architectus. For the next one hundred and fifty years after the appearance of this work every writer on this subject referred to Paracelsus.
    No other complete edition of Paracelsus’ works in their original form was attempted until Sudhoff’s edition (1922-1933). The volume of surgical writings prepared by Huser was published in 1605 after his death. The second collected German edition is in four volumes folio, 1603-1605. Complete sets of the collected works are rare on the market and Pagel notes that the Huser quarto was ‘now difficult to obtain’, and indeed many copies are imperfect.

    (less)

    Bibliography: Sudhoff 220 and 222a; VD16 ZV12161; Durling 3476 for the first edition, and 3514 for the collected edition (incomplete); Heirs 212; Waller 7124; Wellcome 4762; Garrison--Morton 2118.1 (1567); see Walter Pagel, Paracelsus. An Introduction to Philosophical Medicine in the Era of the Renaissance (2nd edition, Basle etc, 1982), pp. 26 and 102, n. 268; for a long and detailed account of the book and its importance, George Rosen, The History of Miners' Diseases (New York, 1943), pp. 64--8; Koelsch, Paracelsus Von der Bergsucht, (1925).

    View basket More details Price: £6,000.00
  • LE JARDIN DES PLANTES by [PARIS - JARDIN DU ROI.] BOITARD, Pierre.
    [PARIS - JARDIN DU ROI.] BOITARD, Pierre.
    LE JARDIN DES PLANTES Description et moeurs des mamifères de la ménagerie et du Muséum d’Histoire Naturelle... précède d’une introduction historique, descriptive et pittoresque par M. J. Janin. Paris, J. J. Dubochet et Ce Éditeurs, rue de Seine, 55.

    1842. Large 8vo, pp. [vi] including initial blank, lxvi, [ii], 472, [ii] blank; with four full-page hand-coloured ornithological plates (retaining tissue guards), two wood-engraved portraits of Buffon and Cuvier by Karl Girardet, one folding aquatint plan (somewhat foxed and cropped close at head shaving title), 51 full-page wood engraved plates, and with coloured title-page vignette and a further 214 charming coloured wood engraved head and tail-pieces; small nick with loss at title-page gutter, and small dink at head of p. 373, some foxing and soiling throughout to both text and plates, the plates at p. 92, 313, 373 and 428 very browned being printed on different paper stock; with old accession numbers in ms at head of front paper, and…

    (more)

    1842. Large 8vo, pp. [vi] including initial blank, lxvi, [ii], 472, [ii] blank; with four full-page hand-coloured ornithological plates (retaining tissue guards), two wood-engraved portraits of Buffon and Cuvier by Karl Girardet, one folding aquatint plan (somewhat foxed and cropped close at head shaving title), 51 full-page wood engraved plates, and with coloured title-page vignette and a further 214 charming coloured wood engraved head and tail-pieces; small nick with loss at title-page gutter, and small dink at head of p. 373, some foxing and soiling throughout to both text and plates, the plates at p. 92, 313, 373 and 428 very browned being printed on different paper stock; with old accession numbers in ms at head of front paper, and also stamped at lower corner; small paper pocket mounted on front pastedown, to house original engraved entrance ticket for four people, and signed in a contemporary hand ‘P(?) D, de Blainville’; in contemporary green morocco backed pebble cloth, covers ruled in blind, spine attractively tooled and lettered in gilt depicting birds, flowers, trees, a bear, giraffe and monkeys, all edges gilt, with moiré endpapers,inner hinges starting but holding firm, both upper and lower joints cracked at head, with 6cm split to upper joint, surfaces a little rubbed, corners bumped with signs of previous minor repairs; housed within later red paperbacked card slip-case. Rare deluxe hand-coloured edition of this copiously illustrated guide to the menagerie within Paris Natural History Museum. The work of Pierre Boitard (1789-1858), with an extensive historical introduction by Jules Janin (1804-1874), the work appears to have been originally published in weekly parts in the magazine ‘Le Pantheon populaire illustre’ the previous year, before being published in book form in 1842.
    A two volume companion work, under a similar title, was also published between 1842-43, and which described the plants within the famous gardens themselves, penned by Pierre Bernard, Emmanuel Le Maout, and published by L. Curmer (see Grolier 65 and 66).

    (less)

    Bibliography: Brivois, Bibliographie des ouvrages illustrés du XIXème, p. 213; Carteret III, Le Trésor du bibliophile, p. 97; Nissen ZBI 454; Vicaire I, Manuel de l'mateur de livres du XIXème, 837.

    View basket More details Price: £775.00
  • NOUVELLE DESCRIPTION DE CE QU’IL Y A DE REMARQUABLE A LA MÉNAGERIE by [PARIS - JARDIN DU ROI.] [GUIDEBOOK.] MUSÉUM D’HISTOIRE NATURELLE, MÉNAGERIE, JARDIN DU ROI, PARIS.
    [PARIS - JARDIN DU ROI.] [GUIDEBOOK.] MUSÉUM D’HISTOIRE NATURELLE, MÉNAGERIE, JARDIN DU ROI, PARIS.
    NOUVELLE DESCRIPTION DE CE QU’IL Y A DE REMARQUABLE A LA MÉNAGERIE et au Cabinet d’Histoire Naturelle du Jardin du Roi. Contenant la vie et les habitudes des Animaux féroces qui sont renfermés tant à la Ménagerie que dans la Vallée-Suisse. Suivie des curiosités qui se trouvent au Cabinet d’Histoire Naturelle. 1 Franc. Lagny, Imprimerie d’a le Boyer et Compagnie.

    1837. 12mo, pp. 48; with engraved frontispiece; one leaf detached; some occasional light soiling and marginal staining, with some minor nicking and edgewear; uncut, and stitched as issued in the original pink decorative wrappers, head and tail of spine a little nicked, upper corner of front wrapper torn with small loss, overall a little dog-eared but an appealing, unsophisticated copy. A so far unrecorded issue, with a Lagny imprint, of this appealing guide-book to the famous ménagerie and natural history cabinet, located within the botanical gardens of the Jardin du Roi in Paris, the heart of the famous Muséum d’Histoire Naturelle. This small portable walking guide, first leads the visitor/reader past the cages housing the ‘ferocious beasts’, followed by a…

    (more)

    1837. 12mo, pp. 48; with engraved frontispiece; one leaf detached; some occasional light soiling and marginal staining, with some minor nicking and edgewear; uncut, and stitched as issued in the original pink decorative wrappers, head and tail of spine a little nicked, upper corner of front wrapper torn with small loss, overall a little dog-eared but an appealing, unsophisticated copy. A so far unrecorded issue, with a Lagny imprint, of this appealing guide-book to the famous ménagerie and natural history cabinet, located within the botanical gardens of the Jardin du Roi in Paris, the heart of the famous Muséum d’Histoire Naturelle. This small portable walking guide, first leads the visitor/reader past the cages housing the ‘ferocious beasts’, followed by a visit to the aviary, then the monkey gallery, past the famous rotunda where one could wonder at the large herbivores, notably the famous giraffe and elephants. From their we are taken into the ‘galerie du muséum de l’histoire naturelle’ including various taxonomic specimens and mineral collections, before visiting the ‘cabinet d’anatomie comparée’, housing skeletons, and anatomical specimens including some ‘monstrosities’. In contrast to the more popular and itinerant ‘anatomical museums’ of the time, however, the cabinet is far less sensational, and much more scientific - in keeping with the founding precepts of the museum. The pamphlet concludes with a very brief description of some of the ‘sept mille plantes’ found within the botanical gardens themselves. The final paragraph gives details of the opening hours. The ferocious animals can be seen every day from 11-4, with ‘peaceful’ animals on view to the public on Tuesday, Friday and Sunday from 11-6. The natural history cabinet is open to the public on Tuesday and Friday (3-6), and to foreigners on Monday, Thursday and Saturday, every week, from 10-3.
    Formalised in 1794 after the revolution, guide books for the museum and the gardens soon became popular, and as with all popular tourist guides, the present guide to the ménagerie in particular seems to have gone through several iterations. The earliest we have so far located of this particular guide is dated 1821, although guides with the variant title of ‘Description de ce qu’il y a de remarquable a la ménagerie’, and with a Paris imprint. were published in 1818. Whilst the format for this earlier work bears similarities to the present issue, the text is quite different, although the 1820 issue of ‘Description’ certainly included the same frontispiece as here, that of ‘L’ours Martin’ or Martin bear - so named after Saint-Martin, protector of the poor and ‘bear hunter’. Revisions of the text were no doubt undertaken annually to reflect the change of exhibits. We have so far located only one other example of a Lagny imprint, from the previous year. By its very ephemeral nature, all issues are extremely uncommon, with only a handful of locations noted for each issue on OCLC, and seemingly very few held in the US.
    Established by King Louis XIII originally as a medicinal garden, the Jardin du Roi (now known as the Jardin des plantes) was opened to the public as a botanical garden in 1640, and through the influence and direction of such noted botanists and natural scientists as the Jussieu brothers and then George-Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon, the Jardin du Roi came to double in size. Buffon was inspired by Italian Renaissance garden design, and planted tree-lined promenades; added different levels to the grounds as well as large-scale parterres, secret grottos, labyrinths and statuary; and established a renowned research center there, Buffon making the garden a place to study, teach, and exhibit, and establishing its importance as a scientific hub. Post revolution it was expanded again becoming part of the newly established Muséum d’Histoire Naturelle. Twelve new professorial chairs were established under a new director. In addition to the traditional posts in botany, chemistry and anatomy there were now to be others including ones for mineralogy, agriculture and horticulture, forestry, natural history, geology and animal painting, underlying the fact that science was to play an important new role in the new French Republic and the new museum was to be at its heart.
    It was at this time, that the animals from the ménagerie at Versailles, were moved to the Jardin du Roi, to come under the remit of the museum. Its establishment was endorsed on 16 May 1794 by the ‘Comité de Salut public’, making it the second oldest zoo according to modern zoological tradition. Initially, however, the buildings used to house the animals were very dilapidated, and conditions extremely poor, with a high animal mortality rate. The next forty years, therefore, saw a number of construction projects undertaken to build new enclosures, including the monkey and bird houses, bear pits (1805), the rotunda for large herbivores (opened in 1812 and commissioned by Napoleon himself), and the cages and buildings for ferocious animals, many of which still exist today. The collection was effectively begun again through an intensive period of animal acquisition, via purchases, gifts, scientific explorations, as well as from the seizure of other zoological collections through French military victories in Holland, Switzerland, and Italy. Of particular note was the arrival in 1798, after a journey of 23 months, of a pair of elephants seized by French forces from Willem V’s ménagerie of ‘Het Loo’. Perhaps even more impressive was the arrival of a giraffe at the Jardin in 1827, a gift from Muham­mad Ali Pasha al-Mas’ud ibn Agha, the Ottoman viceroy of Egypt, to King Charles X of France. This giraffe, the first ever seen in France, after sailing from Egypt walked all the way from Marseille to Paris, and soon became an instant celebrity. She was accompanied on her trek by Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (1772-1844), the professor of zoology at the Museum, who organised a yellow coat to keep her warm and special boots for her feet. She was greeted by huge crowds throughout the journey, while bands played and street celebrations took place. Saint-Hilaire wrote that they “had to fight the crowds who rushed tumultuously at the animal,” until at last, after 41 days walking, she finally reached the Jardin des Plantes. The first residents of the bear pits were confiscated from bear trainers, and soon gained a reputation for their ferocity, after two visitors (in 1814 and 1820) were killed having rashly entered the enclosure. Indeed the latter incident prompted something of a public outcry, the bear effectively put on trial for his crime. This ‘homicide’, whilst treated by some as a legitimate crime, also became the focus of various parodic pamphlets, putting humanity itself on defence for wrongly ‘oppressing’ others of Martin’s kind, who were only acting according to nature. These tragic incidents nevertheless helped to create public sympathy for the bears, and they became a popular attraction, entertaining generations of families through both their antics and ferociousness.
    Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire ran the ménagerie from 1802 – 1841, and together with Frédéric Cuvier (1773-1838, brother of Georges), who became warden in 1804, became the driving forces behind the major improvements. The involvement of two such distinguished scientists, both more interested in zoology rather than in botany, ensured that the ménagerie became a focus of much of the scientific endeavour undertaken in France during the 19th century, with the surrounding botanical gardens perhaps receiving less attention than they deserved - a fact reflected in guides such as the present example, which focus more on the exotic animals rather than on the plants. Whilst officially entertainment was not a priority, as the present scarce guide-books attests, however, the ménagerie became an attraction for visitors, the animal collection seen as a positive way to broaden the horizons of Parisians and those from further afield.

    (less)

    Bibliography: See Paula Young Lee ‘The Curious Affair of Monsieur Martin the bear’, Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies Vol. 33 (no. 4) 2010.

    View basket More details Price: £585.00