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  • Early home cinema - Cinderella rendered in transparent colour
    ATTRACTIVE SET OF 12 TISSUE STEREOGRAPHS OR FRENCH TISSUES, by [THEATRICAL STEREOGRAPHS.] [BLOCK, Adolphe, photographer.]
    [THEATRICAL STEREOGRAPHS.] [BLOCK, Adolphe, photographer.]
    ATTRACTIVE SET OF 12 TISSUE STEREOGRAPHS OR FRENCH TISSUES, Illustrating a production of Cinderella: Cendrillon Féerie. Les Théatres de Paris. 12 Scènes Vues Au Stéréoscope. B. K. Editeur, Paris, [Photographies en tous genres vuews de tous les pays, A. Block, Edit, Paris]. [n.d. but ca.

    1889.]. Boxed set containing 12 albumen print stereographs, backed with hand-coloured paper sheets, creating a transparency effect, each paired image set within a thick card frames, laid down with ornately decorated pink glazed paper; a number of cards perforated with pin-pricks to allow for lighting effects, one set with more prominent deliberate tissue excision; housed within the original blue card box with wallet lid, with chromolithograph label mounted on upper cover, extremities lightly rubbed and worn; box a little delicate, but otherwise very good. A rare and most attractive set, retaining the original printed box, of this stereoscopic adaptation of Cinderella. A fine example of tissue stereographs, or French Tissues as they were more commonly known, this technique was a…

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    1889.]. Boxed set containing 12 albumen print stereographs, backed with hand-coloured paper sheets, creating a transparency effect, each paired image set within a thick card frames, laid down with ornately decorated pink glazed paper; a number of cards perforated with pin-pricks to allow for lighting effects, one set with more prominent deliberate tissue excision; housed within the original blue card box with wallet lid, with chromolithograph label mounted on upper cover, extremities lightly rubbed and worn; box a little delicate, but otherwise very good. A rare and most attractive set, retaining the original printed box, of this stereoscopic adaptation of Cinderella. A fine example of tissue stereographs, or French Tissues as they were more commonly known, this technique was a creative twist on the more typical albumen stereoviews, and became a popular novelty during the late 1850s and which draw inspiration from the transparency tricks of earlier peep shows.
    The set consists of 12 stereo-albumen prints (of paired images) taken from a wet collodian negative. The verso of each photograph has been delicately enhanced with a thin layer of hand-coloured tissue sheets, with a further thin layer of tissue then laid down to control the backlighting, and thus creating drama and depth of field. When viewed without a light source, the images appear flat and uninteresting, but once placed in front of a light they create atmospheric and enchanting scenes. As was typical of the genre, the thick card frame is elaborately decorated, and printed with the series title, and the name of the publisher, in this case B. K. of Paris - who produced a number of such works. Additional lighting effects could be created with the addition of pin-holes, and indeed one card in the present set has had some of the tissue neatly excised to create a beam of light, with others including pin-pricks.
    The present most appealing example is part of the collection series ‘Les Théatres de Paris’, and presents a theatrical production of the famous fairy-story ‘Cinderella’, very much in vogue during the 19th century, and which formed the basis for a number of ballets, operas, and theatrical productions. We believe these photographs to be drawn from the 1866 production ‘ Cendrillon ou la Pantoufle merveilleuse, grande féerie en cinq actes et trente tableaux par MM. Clairville, Albert Monnier et Ernest Blum, musique nouvelle de M.Victor Chéri’, and performed at the Théâtre impérial du Châtelet.
    The publisher ‘B.K.’ is in fact the photographer Adolphe Block (1829-1918), actor, studio photographer, and publisher, who from 1863 became known for his stereoscopic views. The inside lid of the box retains a printed catalogue, though somewhat scratched and partially erased, which lists other sets available for purchase, and includes reference to a set of views of the 1889 exhibition, which suggests this to be a later issue of the set.

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    Bibliography: One set located at Harvard, which may be earlier, with variant title ‘Cendrillon Féerie du Théâtres Impérial du Châtelet’.

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  • “THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT” by [TRADE CATALOGUE.] HEIDRITTER LUMBER CO.,
    [TRADE CATALOGUE.] HEIDRITTER LUMBER CO.,
    “THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT” or the cost of hardwood versus softwood. The Actual Experience of a Home Builder. [The Heidritter Lumber Co. Elizabeth, New Jersey.] n.p. but presumably New Jersey, n.d. but ca. 1920-

    1940.]. Oblong 4to, 192 x 270mm; pp. 16; text printed in red and black; illustrated throughout including some chromolithograph; some light browning and soiling, with faint hint of previous dampstaining though insignificant; stapled as issued in the original brown card wrappers, embossed and printed in red and green, upper wrapper with window, staples slightly rusted, covers a little soiled and creased, with small tear at tail of upper cover; a good copy. A scarce and striking trade catalogue issued by the New Jersey Heidritter Lumber Company and which extols the virtues of using hardwood over softwood in the construction of a house. The embossed upper cover proclaims ‘400% profit on “The House that Jack Built”’, and states that though hardwood…

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    1940.]. Oblong 4to, 192 x 270mm; pp. 16; text printed in red and black; illustrated throughout including some chromolithograph; some light browning and soiling, with faint hint of previous dampstaining though insignificant; stapled as issued in the original brown card wrappers, embossed and printed in red and green, upper wrapper with window, staples slightly rusted, covers a little soiled and creased, with small tear at tail of upper cover; a good copy. A scarce and striking trade catalogue issued by the New Jersey Heidritter Lumber Company and which extols the virtues of using hardwood over softwood in the construction of a house. The embossed upper cover proclaims ‘400% profit on “The House that Jack Built”’, and states that though hardwood may initially be more expensive, that the long term rewards will be significant. In particular it focuses upon the use of ‘Wisconsin Birch - the American Mahogany’. The catalogue also includes "Korelock" doors, patented in 1923, and manufactured by the Paine Lumber Company of Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The Heidritter Co., at one time operated seven saw mills and owned over two hundred and twenty-five square miles of timber lands at Quebec, Canada. This trade catalogue is seemingly unrecorded.

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  • A GEOGRAPHICAL PRESENT; by VENNING, Mary Anne.
    VENNING, Mary Anne.
    A GEOGRAPHICAL PRESENT; being descriptions of the principal countries of the world. With representations of the various Inhabitants in their respective costumes, beautifully coloured. Third Edition. London: Printed for Harvey and Darton, Gracechurch-Street.

    1820. 12mo, pp. 144; with 60 charming engraved plates of costumes, hand-coloured; lacking front free endpaper; some light marginal browning and occasional light foxing and soiling, one plate with small nick in fore-edge, otherwise clean and crisp; with contemporary ownership signature on recto of frontispiece dated 1849; later 19th century binding by Bayntun’s of Bath, in full red morocco, with gilt floral border, spine in compartments with raised bands, lettered and tooled in gilt, all edges gilt, head and tail of spine and joints rubbed; with small ownership label on rear pastedown ‘AHA’. An attractive hand-coloured copy, and in a later Bayntun binding, of the third edition (first 1817), of this the most successful geographical primer by Mary Anne Venning.…

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    1820. 12mo, pp. 144; with 60 charming engraved plates of costumes, hand-coloured; lacking front free endpaper; some light marginal browning and occasional light foxing and soiling, one plate with small nick in fore-edge, otherwise clean and crisp; with contemporary ownership signature on recto of frontispiece dated 1849; later 19th century binding by Bayntun’s of Bath, in full red morocco, with gilt floral border, spine in compartments with raised bands, lettered and tooled in gilt, all edges gilt, head and tail of spine and joints rubbed; with small ownership label on rear pastedown ‘AHA’. An attractive hand-coloured copy, and in a later Bayntun binding, of the third edition (first 1817), of this the most successful geographical primer by Mary Anne Venning. The work ‘skilfully blends quantitative statistics about manufactures and major rivers with qualitative judgements about national greatness. This combination propelled the text into two more editions in 1818 and 1820, and it was later published in America (in 1829, 1830, and 1831) as three separate volumes on Europe, Asia, and Africa by children’s publisher William Burgess... Venning’s ideas had a broad circulation, launching her career as a scientific writer and establishing her authority as an educator of the young’ (Norcia, p. 34).

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    Bibliography: Darton: G975 (3); Lipperheide, 480; Osborne, I, p. 193 (first edition); see Megan Norcia, X Marks the Spot: Women Writers Map the Empire for British Children, 1790-1895 ff. 33 for a detailed discussion of the work

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  • First catalogue of the ‘theatrum anatomicum’ at Greifswald
    VEREICHNIß DER PRÄPARATEN WELCHE AUF DEM ANATOMISCHEN THEATER DER AKADEMIE ZU GREIFSWALD by WESTPHAL, Andreas.
    WESTPHAL, Andreas.
    VEREICHNIß DER PRÄPARATEN WELCHE AUF DEM ANATOMISCHEN THEATER DER AKADEMIE ZU GREIFSWALD befindlich sich nebst einer vorrede von dem einfluß der zergliederungskunst in die glückseligkeit eines staats. Stralsund geduckt bey Hieronymus Johann Struck.

    [1760.]. Small 4to, pp. [vi], 38; with woodcut initials and head- and tail-pieces; lightly browned and foxed throughout, with some faint dampstaining at upper gutter, some small discrete paper repairs at upper gutter of prelims, at pp. 36-37, and to outer margins of final two leaves; bound in later 19th century blue paper boards, though retaining original decorative paper backstrip bound in, some light rubbing and wear to spine, with slight loss of paper at head and tail; a good copy. The uncommon first printed catalogue of the anatomical collection of the University of Greifswald, founded in 1750 in conjunction with the establishment of the Anatomical Theatre and Institute, under the Directorship of the professor of anatomy, Andreas Westphal (1720-1788).…

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    [1760.]. Small 4to, pp. [vi], 38; with woodcut initials and head- and tail-pieces; lightly browned and foxed throughout, with some faint dampstaining at upper gutter, some small discrete paper repairs at upper gutter of prelims, at pp. 36-37, and to outer margins of final two leaves; bound in later 19th century blue paper boards, though retaining original decorative paper backstrip bound in, some light rubbing and wear to spine, with slight loss of paper at head and tail; a good copy. The uncommon first printed catalogue of the anatomical collection of the University of Greifswald, founded in 1750 in conjunction with the establishment of the Anatomical Theatre and Institute, under the Directorship of the professor of anatomy, Andreas Westphal (1720-1788). Westphal had been inspired to create a ‘theatrum anatomicum’, having experienced at first hand the educational benefits of having access to an anatomical collection, during his time in Berlin studying under August Budde (1695-1753), Director of the Berlin ‘theatrum anatomicum’ and professor of anatomy and physiology. Not only inspirational, Westphal’s connections with Berlin were to prove pivotal to the foundation of the Greifswald collection, through the early acquisition of the personal collection of August Schaarschmidt (1720-1791). Schaarschmidt, a dissector of anatomy at Berlin, was himself curator of the main collection there, and author of its own first printed catalogue, ‘Verzeichniss der Merkwürdigkeiten, welche bei dem Anatomischen Theater zu Berlin befindlich sind’ in 1750. Our understanding is that this acquisition of the Schaarschmidt collection occurred around 1750, although the purchase may have taken place when Schaarschmidt left Berlin in 1760, to accept a position at the newly founded University of Bützow. Westphal seems to have born much of the cost of this purchase himself, but it formed the basis of what was to become a signification collection which was expanded by Westphal and his successors, to include a notable comparative anatomy collection of skeletons and skulls.
    This, the first such catalogue of the collection, lists 175 specimens, many of which had been prepared by Westphal and his students, before then examining a number of them in greater detail. Whilst a testament to his work and dedication so far, in his dedication to the Swedish politician, Jakob Albrecht von Lantingshausen (1699-1769, and at the time commander-in-chief of Pomerania, of which Greifswald was the centre), Westphal takes the opportunity to express his desire that the anatomical cabinets be ‘fortified and expanded’, with the aim of ultimately promoting the importance of the art of dissection. During his time at Greifswald, Westphal made various appeals to the University authorities to create separate schools of surgery and midwifery, although these were ultimately rejected. Certainly his low opinion on the general level of skill of rural midwives is evident within the present preface, Westphal criticising the upper classes for entrusting their care to women who though calling themselves midwives, were frequently of poor intelligence, or at best only ‘tolerably stupid’, with no practical experience other than having been pregnant themselves, or possibly having read Justine Siegemundin’s work, and recommends that their knowledge should be assessed before letting them loose.

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    Bibliography: Erman & Horn, Bibliography of German Universities II, no. 6421; not in Murray, Museums; see Wegner, Richard N. ‘Die Geschichte des Anatomischen Instituts und Museums der Universität Greifswald aus der Festschrift zur 500- Jahrfeier der Universität Greifswald (Wiss. Z. Ernst- Moritz- Arndt- Univ., Math.- Naturw. R. 2 (1956) 282- 297).

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  • Including styles ‘suitable for females’
    A NEW PLAN OF WRITING COPIES, by WRIFFORD, Allison.
    WRIFFORD, Allison.
    A NEW PLAN OF WRITING COPIES, with accompanying explanations and remarks, written, designed, and systematically arranged by A. Wrifford... Engraved for the author, by D. Fairman, and printed by W. Hooker – and for sale by the various booksellers throughout the United States. Boston: W. Hooker for the author,

    1810. Small oblong 8vo, pp. 8; with 6 leaves of engraved writing samples; some light browning and staining, leave edges a little frayed; stab stitched in the original sugar paper wrappers with printed title label on upper cover. Apparently the first edition of this attractive penmanship copybook. Abel ‘Allison’ Wrifford (ca. 1780- 1844) was born at Hopkinton, Hillsborough, New Hampshire in 1779 and died there in 1844. He was teaching penmanship from at least 1809, the year before his New plan of writing copies was first published at Boston. He moved to Concord in 1831 and taught there and in the vicinity for several years (www.myrootsplace.com).
    Although he says the method of teaching is his own, Wrifford acknowledges that…

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    1810. Small oblong 8vo, pp. 8; with 6 leaves of engraved writing samples; some light browning and staining, leave edges a little frayed; stab stitched in the original sugar paper wrappers with printed title label on upper cover. Apparently the first edition of this attractive penmanship copybook. Abel ‘Allison’ Wrifford (ca. 1780- 1844) was born at Hopkinton, Hillsborough, New Hampshire in 1779 and died there in 1844. He was teaching penmanship from at least 1809, the year before his New plan of writing copies was first published at Boston. He moved to Concord in 1831 and taught there and in the vicinity for several years (www.myrootsplace.com).
    Although he says the method of teaching is his own, Wrifford acknowledges that the elementary principles are taken from John Jenkins’ The art of writing, 1793. Jenkins’ work, first published in Boston in 1791, was the first original American handwriting manual and was quickly copied or imitated, first by Henry Dean’s Improved analytical guide (Salem, 1805), then by James Carver’s New and easy introduction (Philadelphia, 1809). In later editions, Wrifford dropped his acknowledgement to Jenkins. What is odd about his citation of the 1793 edition of Jenkins is that no such edition survives (the 1813 edition is always referred to as the second), so Wrifford is either mistaken about the date, or he is referring to an edition which is now lost.
    Further editions of Wrifford’s work appeared in 1812 and 1813.

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    Bibliography: Shaw & Shoemaker, 22109; Nash, American Penmanship, 38; not in Bonacini or Berlin; R. Williams, ‘Without a borrowed hand: the beginnings of American penmanship’ Society of Scribes Journal (2000), 3–11; OCLC locates copies at Columbia, Yale, Chicago, Indiana, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Minnesota, Dartmouth College, Princeton, the American Antiquarian Society, the Huntington, and the British Library.

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