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  • ATTRACTIVE CHROMOLITHOGRAPH CERTIFICATE OF MERIT by [WOMEN ARTISANS.] BRITISH DIARY FARMERS ASSOCATION.
    [WOMEN ARTISANS.] BRITISH DIARY FARMERS ASSOCATION.
    ATTRACTIVE CHROMOLITHOGRAPH CERTIFICATE OF MERIT awarded to Elea Adine Hare by the British Dairy Farmers’ Association ‘For Proficiency in the Theory and Practice of Cheddar Cheesemaking’ and ‘on the recommendation of the examiners appointed by the Council’. Signed, we believe in manuscript, by the Secretary ‘Fredik [sic Frederick] E Hardcastle’. 12. Hanover Square, London, W.

    1911. Large folio broadside, 615 x 505mm, pictorial chromolithograph surround and red letterpress, surrounded by gilt border, with larger 95mm tear at tail just touching gilt border, and with further small nicks and tears along upper and right margin; nevertheless a most striking example. A most attractively printed certificate of merit, evoking images of a bygone era pre WWI when traditional rural skills still held sway. Presented to Elea Adine Hare, this large certificate of merit recognises her ‘Proficiency in the Theory and Practice of Cheddar Cheesemaking’, and was awarded in 1911 after examination. Printed in red letterpress, the text is surrounded by a series of appealing vignettes in lithograph depicting various scenes of farming life.
    According a family genealogy…

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    1911. Large folio broadside, 615 x 505mm, pictorial chromolithograph surround and red letterpress, surrounded by gilt border, with larger 95mm tear at tail just touching gilt border, and with further small nicks and tears along upper and right margin; nevertheless a most striking example. A most attractively printed certificate of merit, evoking images of a bygone era pre WWI when traditional rural skills still held sway. Presented to Elea Adine Hare, this large certificate of merit recognises her ‘Proficiency in the Theory and Practice of Cheddar Cheesemaking’, and was awarded in 1911 after examination. Printed in red letterpress, the text is surrounded by a series of appealing vignettes in lithograph depicting various scenes of farming life.
    According a family genealogy found online, Elea Adine Hare (1894-1926) was born in 1894 in Saffron Walden, Essex. The tranquil life that she enjoyed as evoked by the certificate was soon to be altered dramatically, as she subsequently served as a Red Cross nurse during WWI. After the war she was employed by the Essex County Council as a milk recorder, but was fatally injured in some sort of accident near a street corner, probably after being struck by a car. She subsequently died on Aug. 14, 1926 at the hospital in Saffron Walden.

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  • LETTER-BAGS. by [WORD GAME]. [DRURY, MISS M. I., MISS O. H. DRURY, and Alexander MILLAR].
    [WORD GAME]. [DRURY, MISS M. I., MISS O. H. DRURY, and Alexander MILLAR].
    LETTER-BAGS. Regd. A word-making game for any number of players on an Entirely New Principle. “As Fascinating as Bridge”. Invented by the late Alexander Millar. [n.d. but ca.

    1920s?]. Consisting of one lidded card box 115 x 160m, containing within four separate lidded boxes 75 x 55mm; complete, each box containing a set of 90 different coloured lettered squares in white, blue, pink and yellow (of which five are blank in each set); upper lid of each with printed text giving the numbers of individual letters; sets bright and clean; some light soiling to boxes; seemingly without the original blue cloth ‘caller’s bag’ usually missing; A lovely bright set of this appealing game, similar in vein to scrabble, and seemingly the brainchild of two entrepreneurial sisters in Dublin. The game consists of a box containing four separate boxes, each of which contains 85 small square cards with letters…

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    1920s?]. Consisting of one lidded card box 115 x 160m, containing within four separate lidded boxes 75 x 55mm; complete, each box containing a set of 90 different coloured lettered squares in white, blue, pink and yellow (of which five are blank in each set); upper lid of each with printed text giving the numbers of individual letters; sets bright and clean; some light soiling to boxes; seemingly without the original blue cloth ‘caller’s bag’ usually missing; A lovely bright set of this appealing game, similar in vein to scrabble, and seemingly the brainchild of two entrepreneurial sisters in Dublin. The game consists of a box containing four separate boxes, each of which contains 85 small square cards with letters of the alphabet printed on both sides, together with a further 5 blank cards ‘to replace lost letters’. The four sets are printed in different colours: white, blue, pink and yellow.
    The present set retains the original instruction leaf: ‘The object of the game is to form as many and as long words as possible out of each of the sets of letters supplied ... each set contains 85 letters, the proportional quantities of each letter being the same as used by printers. Each set is kept in a small box or bag, with a larger bag for the “Caller”’. Each player takes a set, except for the “Caller”, who keeps his set n a bag ‘from which he draws them one by one at random’. As each letter is called, the player takes the corresponding letter from his set, and places them ‘in not more than six vertical or horizontal columns, endeavouring to arrange them so as to form complete words, reading vertically downwards or horizontally across’.
    According to the main lid, the game was ‘invented by the late Alexander Millar’, but as the instruction leaf reveals, and as previous examples handled have revealed, the marketing and distribution of the game appears to have been undertaken by two sisters. For this present example, the printed note states that the game could only be obtained from ‘Miss M. I. Drury’ of 2 Royal Terrace, Kingstown, Co. Dublin. An old address of ‘Farnagh, York Road’ has been crossed out in brown ink. Previous examples handled have had printed instructions noting that copies were available from ‘Miss O. H. Drury, Farnagh,, Kingstown, Dublin’. Our assumption is that this is a later version, and that for some reason Miss O. H. Drury was no longer involved in the enterprise. The existence of what we believe to be earlier sets suggests therefore that the game proved relatively popular. The price of the sets appears to have changed over time, varying from ‘Price 1/8 per set. Postage Extra. 1 set 4d., 2 sets 5d., etc’, through ‘2/6 set post free’, to the present set available for ‘3/6 per set, post free’. Other sets located in the Ballam Collection and at the National Trust Museum of Childhood. Only the Ballam collection set appears to retain the original blue callers’ bag. Sets located at the National Trust Museum of Childhood, in the Ballam Collection at the Bodleian, and in the Osborne Collection at Toronto.

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    Condition: in the original white box, upper lid printed, box lightly soiled and stained, small abrasion on base, light bumping to extremities; a good bright example.

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  • ATTRACTIVELY PENNED CHILD’S EXERCISE BOOK by [WUILLEUMIER, Emma.]
    [WUILLEUMIER, Emma.]
    ATTRACTIVELY PENNED CHILD’S EXERCISE BOOK the first seven pages of which contain a manuscript entitled "Notions du corps humain", and signed by Emma Wuilleumier. [n.p., and n.d., but possibly France of Belgium, and ca. 1840s.]

    1840s. Slim 4to, 210 x 171mm, ff. 21, of which the first four leaves have been neatly penned in brown ink, the remaining leaves remaining blank and unused; with faint ruled vertical margin in pencil, some faint pencil corrections and markings; A most appealing child’s manuscript exercise book, outlining some basic principles of anatomy and physiology, and the work of young Emma Wuilleumier, who has also written her name on the front cover. Though her studies appear not have lasted for very long, sections focus upon the bones and skeleton, the trunk of the body, the arms and legs, and the muscles and tendons. This is a very attractive example of an embossed paper binding, designed for use by children…

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    1840s. Slim 4to, 210 x 171mm, ff. 21, of which the first four leaves have been neatly penned in brown ink, the remaining leaves remaining blank and unused; with faint ruled vertical margin in pencil, some faint pencil corrections and markings; A most appealing child’s manuscript exercise book, outlining some basic principles of anatomy and physiology, and the work of young Emma Wuilleumier, who has also written her name on the front cover. Though her studies appear not have lasted for very long, sections focus upon the bones and skeleton, the trunk of the body, the arms and legs, and the muscles and tendons. This is a very attractive example of an embossed paper binding, designed for use by children and rarely found in good condition.

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    Condition: stitched as issued, and most attractively bound in pink paper wrappers, heavily embossed in cream and pink to form a decorative cartouche within a single line frame, on a blue background, at the centre of the cartouches are oval hand-coloured lithographs of adults and children in garden settings, with a stork on the upper cover and ducks on the lower.

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  • THE SILVER BULLET OR THE ROAD TO BERLIN by [WWI DEXTERITY PUZZLES].
    [WWI DEXTERITY PUZZLES].
    THE SILVER BULLET OR THE ROAD TO BERLIN British Design. Registered. British Made. [n.p., n.d. but produced by R.F. & S, ca. 1914-1919]. [offered together with:] TRENCH GOAL FOOTBALL. [The Great International Game, By the makers of the sensationally successful war game “The Silver Bullet”]. British Design British Made, Registration Applied for. [n.p., n.d. but produced by R.F. & S., ca. 1914-1919.]

    1919. Two wooden framed maze puzzles: Silver Bullet: Wooden box with glass top, 240 x 162 x 25mm, containing die cut thick printed green card laid on pink card base, the cut out grooves forming a track, with a series of holes or ‘hazards’, retaining the metal ball-bearing, but without the instruction sheet usually found mounted on rear of box; Trench Football: Wooden box with glass top, 240 x 162 x 25mm, containing die cut thick printed green card laid on pink card base, the cut out grooves forming a track, with holes as ‘hazards’, retaining the metal ball-bearing but prone to getting stuck, retaining the partial instruction sheet on the rear of the box; both boxes showing signs of…

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    1919. Two wooden framed maze puzzles: Silver Bullet: Wooden box with glass top, 240 x 162 x 25mm, containing die cut thick printed green card laid on pink card base, the cut out grooves forming a track, with a series of holes or ‘hazards’, retaining the metal ball-bearing, but without the instruction sheet usually found mounted on rear of box; Trench Football: Wooden box with glass top, 240 x 162 x 25mm, containing die cut thick printed green card laid on pink card base, the cut out grooves forming a track, with holes as ‘hazards’, retaining the metal ball-bearing but prone to getting stuck, retaining the partial instruction sheet on the rear of the box; both boxes showing signs of rubbing and wear. Two evocative WWI wooden framed dexterity or maze puzzles - a game with a high difficulty factor and addictive for both children and adults alike. The object of the The Silver Bullet Game or Road to Berlin is to try and get the small metal ball-bearing pass all of the hazards - i.e. German fortress and Cities and reach the city. Though without the instruction leaf on the back of the box, the game was made by R. F & S and we believe to have been registered around 1914.
    Encouraged by the success of the Silver Bullet, a second game was produced, incorporating the nations’ favourite pastime of football. The player has to skilfully manoeuvre the ball past caricatures of various German figures, starting with The ‘Kick Off’, and hopefully scoring the ‘Goal’ in the Kaiser's mouth. Along the way, the player encounters ‘Little Willie’ (outside right), ‘Von Terpitz’ (centre forward), ‘Von Kluck’ (outside left), ‘Von Bulow’ (inside left), ‘Von Hindenburg’ (inside right), ‘Von der Goltz’ (right half), ‘Von Moltke’ (centre half), ‘Enver Pasha’ (left half), ‘Von Sanders’ (left half), ‘Count Zeppelin’ (right half), and finally the ‘Kaiser’ (Goal). The rules for playing are pasted on the underside, though have been torn with significant loss.

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  • Fighting the ‘enemies in our midst’ and routing out the German Fifth Column - Kitchener’s sister at the forefront
    PRINTED AGENDA AND FOUR RELATED NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS by [WWI]. [WOMEN'S IMPERIAL DEFENCE COUNCIL.]
    [WWI]. [WOMEN'S IMPERIAL DEFENCE COUNCIL.]
    PRINTED AGENDA AND FOUR RELATED NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS concerning the little-known and short-lived British Women’s Organisation, the Women’s Imperial Defence Council, and relating to the two meetings held on February 8th, and March 4th 1918. London,

    1918. Single folio sheet of thick card, 365 x 263mm, seemingly once part of a larger scrapbook of clippings but now loose, with typed agenda sheet and four small related newspaper clippings mounted on verso; recto comprised of a number of unrelated mounted newspaper clippings, small photographs, and membership forms; with remains of linen mount along one margin, card somewhat browned, with some marginal nicks and wear. An unusual, and at first glance rather innocuous if somewhat mysterious, collection of memorabilia, but which in fact shines a light upon the febrile climate of paranoia and suspicion which gripped London and the nation during WWI.
    According to the Dictionary of British Women’s Organisations, 1825-1960, the Women’s Imperial Defence Council as a…

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    1918. Single folio sheet of thick card, 365 x 263mm, seemingly once part of a larger scrapbook of clippings but now loose, with typed agenda sheet and four small related newspaper clippings mounted on verso; recto comprised of a number of unrelated mounted newspaper clippings, small photographs, and membership forms; with remains of linen mount along one margin, card somewhat browned, with some marginal nicks and wear. An unusual, and at first glance rather innocuous if somewhat mysterious, collection of memorabilia, but which in fact shines a light upon the febrile climate of paranoia and suspicion which gripped London and the nation during WWI.
    According to the Dictionary of British Women’s Organisations, 1825-1960, the Women’s Imperial Defence Council as a ‘non-political body’ ... only known from a report of a meeting at the Cannon Street Hotel, London, in 1917, chaired by General Sir Arthur Turner, and addressed exclusively to men, including the future Home Secretary, Sir William Joynson-Hicks’ (p. 169). This meeting, as revealed by the mounted printed agenda, was held on February 8th, 1917 at 2.30pm, with further speeches by Dr Ellis Powell, Mr Arnold White, and A. G. Hales. Such was the interest generated by this first gathering, that a second meeting was organised and held on March 4th at Queen’s Hall, for which over 8000 tickets were apparently sent out, according to the clippings also included here. It was presided over by ‘Mrs Parker, sister of the late Lord Kitchener’.
    The formation of the Council, even though it appears to have proven only short-lived, gave a public forum and voice to the firm belief held by many of the existence of a secret German backed cabal or ‘Unseen Hand’, which since the beginning of the war was thought to have been undermining the very ability of the country effectively to pursue the war, by carrying out acts of espionage, and entrapping leading figures of government and the City alike through high-level vice rings, accusations of sexual perversion, female prostitution and bondage rackets. Spy fever inevitably gripped the nation, with over 9000 reports of suspected espionage received by the Metropolitan Police by September 1914. The sinking of the Lusitania in May 1915 only served to heighten the conspiracy theories. The ‘enemy in our midsts’ became an obsession and by the spring of 1917, when the Council held their meetings, MI5 had amassed the names of 250,000 aliens in Britain, with more detailed files held for over 27,000 suspects.
    As the printed agenda states, the purpose of the meeting was to demand:’That the Government shall appoint without delay a Royal Commission to make a full investigation as to the identity, or identities, of that treacherous influence in our midst know as the “Unseen Hand”. Further, that the Government shall at once dispense with the services, for the period of the War, of all Officials in the Foreign Office, who have married German subjects, or who have any German connections’.
    The apotheosis of this outpouring of suspicion and paranoia, came in the following May, during the infamous libel trial brought by the well-known ‘barefoot’ dancer Maud Allan, against the right wing MP Noel Pemberton Billing - a close associate of one of the speakers at the Cannon Street Hotel, Arnold White. An extraordinary trial which gripped the nation for some six days, Allan was implicitly accused of homosexuality, being rumoured to have had a relationship with Margot Asquith, whilst at the same time being accused of being a German sympathiser by virtue of having undertaken musical training in Berlin. Her ‘erotic’ dancing performances, as well as her recent private appearance in a performance of Oscar Wilde’s notorious play Salome, led to accusations of sexual perversions and sadism. Billing and his associates effectively sealed her fate, however, by their assertion of the existence of a ‘black book’ in the possession of the Germans, and naming 47,000 English men and women vulnerable to blackmail because of their ‘sexual perversions’. During the trial the names of the former PM Herbert Asquith, Margot Asquith, and even of the presiding judge, Justice Darling, were among those mentioned in the book. The book never materialised, but in a way was all the more powerful by its absence. Upon this mythical book was projected a set of paranoid fears and fantasies, concerning the conduct of the war which were at the time incapable of refutation. The trial appears farcical to the modern eye, shamefully conducted on both sides, and with a huge amount of hysteria and baseless accusations. Nevertheless, the prevailing mood of suspicion held sway, and Billings was found not guilty. Pressure mounted on the government and legislation was passed to close German banks, and large rallies continued to be held throughout the summer calling for increasing internment. see Lucy Bland, Modern Women on Trial, p. 39; the British Library holds various unidentified pamphlets and ephemera.

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