Browse

Page:1678
  • “THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT” by [TRADE CATALOGUE.] HEIDRITTER LUMBER CO.,
    [TRADE CATALOGUE.] HEIDRITTER LUMBER CO.,
    “THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT” or the cost of hardwood versus softwood. The Actual Experience of a Home Builder. [The Heidritter Lumber Co. Elizabeth, New Jersey.] n.p. but presumably New Jersey, n.d. but ca. 1920-

    1940.]. Oblong 4to, 192 x 270mm; pp. 16; text printed in red and black; illustrated throughout including some chromolithograph; some light browning and soiling, with faint hint of previous dampstaining though insignificant; A scarce and striking trade catalogue issued by the New Jersey Heidritter Lumber Company and which extols the virtues of using hardwood over softwood in the construction of a house. The embossed upper cover proclaims ‘400% profit on “The House that Jack Built”’, and states that though hardwood may initially be more expensive, that the long term rewards will be significant. In particular it focuses upon the use of ‘Wisconsin Birch - the American Mahogany’. The catalogue also includes "Korelock" doors, patented in 1923, and manufactured by the…

    (more)

    1940.]. Oblong 4to, 192 x 270mm; pp. 16; text printed in red and black; illustrated throughout including some chromolithograph; some light browning and soiling, with faint hint of previous dampstaining though insignificant; A scarce and striking trade catalogue issued by the New Jersey Heidritter Lumber Company and which extols the virtues of using hardwood over softwood in the construction of a house. The embossed upper cover proclaims ‘400% profit on “The House that Jack Built”’, and states that though hardwood may initially be more expensive, that the long term rewards will be significant. In particular it focuses upon the use of ‘Wisconsin Birch - the American Mahogany’. The catalogue also includes "Korelock" doors, patented in 1923, and manufactured by the Paine Lumber Company of Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The Heidritter Co., at one time operated seven saw mills and owned over two hundred and twenty-five square miles of timber lands at Quebec, Canada. This trade catalogue is seemingly unrecorded.

    (less)

    Condition: stapled as issued in the original brown card wrappers, embossed and printed in red and green, upper wrapper with window, staples slightly rusted, covers a little soiled and creased, with small tear at tail of upper cover; a good copy.

    View basket More details Price: £110.00
  • LE CALCUL AMUSANT. by TRIM, (RATISBONNE, Louis, pseudonym).
    TRIM, (RATISBONNE, Louis, pseudonym).
    LE CALCUL AMUSANT. La Table de Pythagore Servie aux petits enfants par Trim et ornée par Bertall. [colophon: Coulommiers. Imprimerie Paul Brodard]. [imprint from upper cover], Paris, Librairie Hachette et Cie. Boulevard Saint-Germain, 79, (n.d. but ca. 1862).

    1862. 4to, ff. [1] title-page, 22; each leaf incorporating hand-coloured engraved illustrations; some occasional minor browning and dust-soiling; final endpaper a little creased with small nick at lower edge; First edition (variant issue) of this most attractive mnemonical work, introducing the young reader to the basics of counting and multiplication, through the use of a series of appealing illustrations and rhyming couplets. ‘Le roi Holopherne et Judith, Six foix huit font quarante-huit’.
    Louis Ratisbonne (1827-1900) was born in Strasbourg. During an extensive literary career, he collaborated on the Journal des débats from 1853 to 1876, became librarian of the Palais de Fontainebleau in 1871, of the Bibliothèque du Luxembourg in 1873, and then of the Senate in 1876. His most…

    (more)

    1862. 4to, ff. [1] title-page, 22; each leaf incorporating hand-coloured engraved illustrations; some occasional minor browning and dust-soiling; final endpaper a little creased with small nick at lower edge; First edition (variant issue) of this most attractive mnemonical work, introducing the young reader to the basics of counting and multiplication, through the use of a series of appealing illustrations and rhyming couplets. ‘Le roi Holopherne et Judith, Six foix huit font quarante-huit’.
    Louis Ratisbonne (1827-1900) was born in Strasbourg. During an extensive literary career, he collaborated on the Journal des débats from 1853 to 1876, became librarian of the Palais de Fontainebleau in 1871, of the Bibliothèque du Luxembourg in 1873, and then of the Senate in 1876. His most important work was a verse translation of the Divine Comedy, which was recognised by the L’Académie française. In the work of children’s literature, his fame rests under his pseudonym of ‘Trim’, Ratisbonne penning a series of popular and attractively illustrated instructional albums for young children, all published by Hachette. OCLC locates copies at Princeton, the University of Southern Mississippi, the British Library, the BnF and the National Library of Spain; tall appear to have a variant colophon: that of Charles Lahure et Cie, and the date is taken from a BnF copy of the same title.

    (less)

    Condition: in the original blue cloth backed pictorial boards, hand-coloured, head and tail of spine very lightly rubbed, some minor soiling to covers.

    View basket More details Price: £300.00
  • A GEOGRAPHICAL PRESENT; by VENNING, Mary Anne.
    VENNING, Mary Anne.
    A GEOGRAPHICAL PRESENT; being descriptions of the principal countries of the world. With representations of the various Inhabitants in their respective costumes, beautifully coloured. Third Edition. London: Printed for Harvey and Darton, Gracechurch-Street.

    1820. 12mo, pp. 144; with 60 charming engraved plates of costumes, uncoloured; lacking front free endpaper; some light foxing and soiling, but generally clean and crisp; An attractive uncoloured copy in the original red morocco binding of the third edition (first 1817), of this the most successful geographical primer by Mary Anne Venning. The work ‘skillfully blends quantitative statistics about manufactures and major rivers with qualitative judgements about national greatness. This combination propelled the text into two more editions in 1818 and 1820, and it was later published in America (in 1829, 1830, and 1831) as three separate volumes on Europe, Asia, and Africa by children’s publisher William Burgess ... Venning’s ideas had a broad circulation, launching her career as…

    (more)

    1820. 12mo, pp. 144; with 60 charming engraved plates of costumes, uncoloured; lacking front free endpaper; some light foxing and soiling, but generally clean and crisp; An attractive uncoloured copy in the original red morocco binding of the third edition (first 1817), of this the most successful geographical primer by Mary Anne Venning. The work ‘skillfully blends quantitative statistics about manufactures and major rivers with qualitative judgements about national greatness. This combination propelled the text into two more editions in 1818 and 1820, and it was later published in America (in 1829, 1830, and 1831) as three separate volumes on Europe, Asia, and Africa by children’s publisher William Burgess ... Venning’s ideas had a broad circulation, launching her career as a scientific writer and establishing her authority as an educator of the young’ (Norcia, p. 34). Check the Dartons: G975? p. 276; Osborne, I, p. 193 (first edition); see Megan Norcia, ‘X Marks the Spot: Women Writers Map the Empire for British Children, 1790-1895’ ff. 33 for a detailed discussion of the work.

    (less)

    Condition: an appealing fine bright copy in the original red roan backed marbled boards, spine ruled and lettered in gilt, head and tail of spine a little rubbed and worn, covers lightly scuffed, extremities bumped and a little worn; with contemporary book label of ‘Ellen Burt’ on front free pastedown and with remains of old Bristol booksellers label.

    View basket More details Price: £225.00
  • A GEOGRAPHICAL PRESENT; by VENNING, Mary Anne.
    VENNING, Mary Anne.
    A GEOGRAPHICAL PRESENT; being descriptions of the principal countries of the world. With representations of the various Inhabitants in their respective costumes, beautifully coloured. Third Edition. London: Printed for Harvey and Darton, Gracechurch-Street.

    1820. 12mo, pp. 144; with 60 charming engraved plates of costumes, hand-coloured; lacking front free endpaper; some light marginal browning and occasional light foxing and soiling, one plate with small nick in fore-edge, otherwise clean and crisp; with contemporary ownership signature on recto of frontispiece dated 1849; An attractive hand-coloured copy, and in a later Bayntun binding, of the third edition (first 1817), of this the most successful geographical primer by Mary Anne Venning. The work ‘skilfully blends quantitative statistics about manufactures and major rivers with qualitative judgements about national greatness. This combination propelled the text into two more editions in 1818 and 1820, and it was later published in America (in 1829, 1830, and 1831) as three separate volumes…

    (more)

    1820. 12mo, pp. 144; with 60 charming engraved plates of costumes, hand-coloured; lacking front free endpaper; some light marginal browning and occasional light foxing and soiling, one plate with small nick in fore-edge, otherwise clean and crisp; with contemporary ownership signature on recto of frontispiece dated 1849; An attractive hand-coloured copy, and in a later Bayntun binding, of the third edition (first 1817), of this the most successful geographical primer by Mary Anne Venning. The work ‘skilfully blends quantitative statistics about manufactures and major rivers with qualitative judgements about national greatness. This combination propelled the text into two more editions in 1818 and 1820, and it was later published in America (in 1829, 1830, and 1831) as three separate volumes on Europe, Asia, and Africa by children’s publisher William Burgess ... Venning’s ideas had a broad circulation, launching her career as a scientific writer and establishing her authority as an educator of the young’ (Norcia, p. 34). Darton: G975 (3); Lipperheide, 480; Osborne, I, p. 193 (first edition); see Megan Norcia, X Marks the Spot: Women Writers Map the Empire for British Children, 1790-1895 ff. 33 for a detailed discussion of the work

    (less)

    Condition: later 19th century binding by Bayntun’s of Bath, in full red morocco, with gilt floral border, spine in compartments with raised bands, lettered and tooled in gilt, all edges gilt, head and tail of spine and joints rubbed; with small ownership label on rear pastedown ‘AHA’.

    View basket More details Price: £325.00
  • PLANCHES APPARTENANT À L’OUVRAGE INTITUTLÉ, CONSIDÉRATIONS SUR LA DIVERSITÉ DES BASSINS by VROLIK, Gerardus.
    VROLIK, Gerardus.
    PLANCHES APPARTENANT À L’OUVRAGE INTITUTLÉ, CONSIDÉRATIONS SUR LA DIVERSITÉ DES BASSINS de différentes races humains. [Amsterdam, Van der Hey, 1826].

    1826. Small folio, pp. [ii] endpaper with original paper title label mounted, and with eight copper engraved plates; printed paper label a little soiled, and with ink inscription ‘Dr Thompson, Prof of Surgery, Edinburgh; plates a little dust-soiled; The atlas volume only of the French edition of Beschouwing van het verschil der bekkens in onderscheidene Volkstammen, both published in 1826 by the renowned Dutch physiologist, anatomist, anthropologist and botanist Gerardus Vrolik (1775-1859). With his son Willem (1801-1863) he established a private anatomical museum, now part of the Amsterdam Medical Centre of the University of Amsterdam, the collections of which formed the basis of a number of comparative studies by the two men, probably most notably Willem’s teratological work of 1849,…

    (more)

    1826. Small folio, pp. [ii] endpaper with original paper title label mounted, and with eight copper engraved plates; printed paper label a little soiled, and with ink inscription ‘Dr Thompson, Prof of Surgery, Edinburgh; plates a little dust-soiled; The atlas volume only of the French edition of Beschouwing van het verschil der bekkens in onderscheidene Volkstammen, both published in 1826 by the renowned Dutch physiologist, anatomist, anthropologist and botanist Gerardus Vrolik (1775-1859). With his son Willem (1801-1863) he established a private anatomical museum, now part of the Amsterdam Medical Centre of the University of Amsterdam, the collections of which formed the basis of a number of comparative studies by the two men, probably most notably Willem’s teratological work of 1849, ‘Tabulae ad illustrandam embryogensin hominis’, though the museum was also famed for its craniological collection.
    In ‘Considérations sur la diversité des bassins de différentes races humaines’ ‘he observed an animal form in the pelvis of the lower races of mankind, and regarded the structure of this part to present race-modifications, but drew scarcely any positive deductions from his limited researches; (The Anthropological review, 1865, p. 206).
    The present copy appears to have belonged to the early nineteenth century Edinburgh surgeon, Professor John Thompson. Although the Biographical Dictionary of the Living Authors of Great Britain (1816) cite him on p. 345, we can find no record of any of his listed works on lithotomy and inflammation having survived.

    (less)

    Condition: in modern black marbled wrappers.

    View basket More details Price: £100.00
  • Important early 13th century Chinese Forensic Medicine disseminated to the West
    GERICHTLICHE MEDIZIN DER CHINESEN by WANG-IN-HOAI, C.F.M. de GRIJS, and Henry BREITENSTEIN (translator).
    WANG-IN-HOAI, C.F.M. de GRIJS, and Henry BREITENSTEIN (translator).
    GERICHTLICHE MEDIZIN DER CHINESEN von Wang-in-Hoai. Nach der holländischen Übersetzung des Herrn C. F. M. de Grys herausgegeben von Dr. H. Breitenstein (Verfassser des werkes ‘21 Jahre in Indien’. Leipzig, Th. Grieben’s Verlag (L. Fernau).

    1908. 8vo, pp. viii, 174, [2] advertisement and blank; some very occasional light marginal browning, gutter cracked t p. 81 and 113 but holding firm; First German edition. A fascination example of how noted and pioneering Chinese medical texts were gradually disseminated for a European audience. The present work by the noted military physician Dr Henry Breitenstein (1848-1930), is a translation of a Dutch work of 1863 by the renowned diplomat, pharmacologist, and sinologist Dr. C. F. M. de Grijs (or de Grys - 1832-1902).
    Though now somewhat forgotten, de Grijs had sailed to China in 1857 on a consular mission, assigned with the task of collecting and identifying Chinese flora and fauna in the Amoy region. Many of…

    (more)

    1908. 8vo, pp. viii, 174, [2] advertisement and blank; some very occasional light marginal browning, gutter cracked t p. 81 and 113 but holding firm; First German edition. A fascination example of how noted and pioneering Chinese medical texts were gradually disseminated for a European audience. The present work by the noted military physician Dr Henry Breitenstein (1848-1930), is a translation of a Dutch work of 1863 by the renowned diplomat, pharmacologist, and sinologist Dr. C. F. M. de Grijs (or de Grys - 1832-1902).
    Though now somewhat forgotten, de Grijs had sailed to China in 1857 on a consular mission, assigned with the task of collecting and identifying Chinese flora and fauna in the Amoy region. Many of his papers are now preserved at Leiden University, and he contributed a number of scientific and botanical papers, including articles on Chinese dyes, and publishing an early and important Dutch-Chinese dictionary.
    One of his most important contributions, however, was his 1863 translation of the Xiyuan Lu (or Se yuen luh), an early handbook on forensic medicine dating from the Yuan dynasty (1279-1368), 300 years before anything comparable appeared in Europe, according to de Grijs in his introduction. First published in around 1247, it was reprinted in the 15th century and from that time came into general use in the courts of justice as a guide to the duties of coroner, and thus forms an interesting and early record of the theoretical condition of jurisprudence at that time. De Grijs’ translation was published by the Batavian Society of Arts and Sciences in 1863 as Geregtelijke geneeskund, uit het Chineesch vertaald (Forensic Medicine, translated from the Chinese). ‘De Grijs used an edition from 1830 with the title Xiyuan lu jizheng huizuan ... In his introduction, De Grijs wrote: “This work is written in a clear style and the main difficulty in translating is to find European synonyms for the Chinese names of plants, animals, stones, medicines, parts of the body, etc.“. He then gave a list of European and Chinese works he had consulted ending: “To what extent I have succeeded in finding the correct European names is up to experts to judge”’ (Kuiper, p 192). A number of consistent misspellings were made however, apparently due to misinterpretations of De Grijs’ handwriting. Dr Henry Breitenstein, himself a military physician, here presents a German translation of that work of 1863, making no corrections, but with the addition of a number of notes. Of interest, Kuiper suggests that Breitenstein felt the work to be of more importance as a guide to Chinese manners and customs, than as a technical handbook of forensic medicine. Modern scholars, however, have come to highly appreciate the handbook. An English translation was first made in 1855 by William Harland and published in Hong Kong as ‘Records of the Washing away of Injuries’. A scholarly edition was published in 1981 by Brian E. McKnight. See Wylie - Notes on Chinese Literature, Introduction no. 70. and p. 75; Kuiper, The Early Dutch Sinologists (1854-1900), pp. 192-3; Otterspeer, Leiden Oriental Connections: 1850-1940, p. 343; see Brian McKnight, The Washing Away of Wrongs, Forensic Medicine in Thirteenth Century China, Science, Medicine & Technology in East Asia, 1 (Ann Arbor .. 1980).

    (less)

    Condition: uncut in the original brown printed card wrappers, old tape repair to front inside cover, head of spine cracked and nicked with evidence of old repair, a couple of small marginal nicks, covers a little creased.

    View basket More details Price: £200.00
  • Innovative and compact merging of word and image offering an unprecedented vision of the human body
    THE EDINBURGH STEREOSCOPIC ATLAS OF ANATOMY by WATERSTON, David and Edward BURNET.
    WATERSTON, David and Edward BURNET.
    THE EDINBURGH STEREOSCOPIC ATLAS OF ANATOMY New Edition. Section I Abdomen. Contents 50 Plates. [- Section V Lower Limbs]. [Copyright T. C. & E. Jack, Edinburgh, & 34 Henrietta Street, London. W.C.] [n.d. but ca.

    1907.]. Together five boxes, Sections I-V, 240 x 190 x 80mm, and with the accompanying wooden and metal viewer; I. Abdomen containing 50 thick cards with mounted stereographs on each; II. Perimeum, Pelvis, and Thorax, containing 50 thick cards with mounted stereographs on each, box without the internal cloth tie; III. Thorax, containing 52 thick cards with mounted stereographs (Axilla no 1 stained); IV. Central nervous System, containing 52 thick cards with mounted stereographs (a couple or cards with ink underlining); V. Lower Limb, containing 46 thick cards with mounted stereographs; in all, 250 cards; cards all a little browned and lightly foxed, but otherwise good, stereographs all good; ‘New edition’ of this remarkable, graphic, and at times gruesome pathological…

    (more)

    1907.]. Together five boxes, Sections I-V, 240 x 190 x 80mm, and with the accompanying wooden and metal viewer; I. Abdomen containing 50 thick cards with mounted stereographs on each; II. Perimeum, Pelvis, and Thorax, containing 50 thick cards with mounted stereographs on each, box without the internal cloth tie; III. Thorax, containing 52 thick cards with mounted stereographs (Axilla no 1 stained); IV. Central nervous System, containing 52 thick cards with mounted stereographs (a couple or cards with ink underlining); V. Lower Limb, containing 46 thick cards with mounted stereographs; in all, 250 cards; cards all a little browned and lightly foxed, but otherwise good, stereographs all good; ‘New edition’ of this remarkable, graphic, and at times gruesome pathological atlas of anatomy prepared under the auspices of the Department of Anatomy at the University of Edinburgh, and of particular appeal in retaining the original wooden and metal stereoscopic viewer, most often now missing. The five ‘volumes’ of boxed illustrations (resembling books with spine titles and designed to fit library shelves), contain some 250 thick cards each mounted with stereoscopic images together with accompanying explanatory text, and provide a vivid, realistic and unprecedented three dimensional view of the entire human body, helping students to gain important insights into the structure and spaces of the body.
    The invention of photography had a big impact on anatomical teaching, but, like drawings, was limited by being a two dimensional representation. Stereoscopy in fact predates photography, but its mass appeal depended entirely upon the development of photographic processes. Originally little more than an optical toy, once it was amalgamated with photography it became a uniquely powerful medium. ‘Stereo photography combined the work of two Victorian inventors, Sir Charles Wheatsone and Sir David Brewster, who used photography to popularise their discoveries. Stereo negatives when exposed in a camera produced two almost identical photographs which were then placed in a viewer that enabled them to be seen three dimensionally’ (Powerhouse Museum). Stereographs, double images (taken from positions equivalent to those of the left and right eyes) presented side-by-side on a flat card and looked at through a special viewer, were displayed to great effect at the Great Exhibition in 1851, and quickly became something of a phenomenon. Initially largely for domestic use, the educational opportunities, especially for the medical profession, were soon recognised. Improved photographic technology in the second half of the 19th century further simplified the production of stereographs. The first first atlas of medicine was produced by Albert Neisser (1855-1916), who between 1894 and 1911 produced 57 boxed sets.
    The date of the original edition of The Edinburgh Stereoscopic Atlas of Anatomy is unclear though is believed to be around 1905-1906 (based on contemporary reviews, although Roberta McGrath in ‘Seeing Her Sex’ p. 144 suggests 1890), with this, the ‘New Edition’ thought to date from 1907. David Waterston, was a lecturer and senior demonstrator at the Anatomical Department of Edinburgh and prepared the anatomical dissections. The first edition was issued by the Caxton Publishing Company. Over time, it was expanded to ten volumes, that included 324 stereographs, with issues also produced in the US and Canada. An equally graphic ‘Edinburgh Stereoscopic Atlas of Obstetrics’ was issued in 1908-1909, edited by George Simpson and Edward Burnet.

    (less)

    Condition: in the original dark pink cloth boxes, all five with title and explanatory labels on fore-edges (labels are somewhat browned, scuffed and faded in places), all five boxes somewhat faded, frayed and worn, with some splitting to joints, Box 3 most noticeably worn; some wear evident on viewer.

    View basket More details Price: £1,800.00
  • By the first British patent holder for a hearing aid
    A NEW AND FAMILIAR TREATISE ON THE STRUCTURE OF THE EAR, by WEBSTER, Alphonso William.
    WEBSTER, Alphonso William.
    A NEW AND FAMILIAR TREATISE ON THE STRUCTURE OF THE EAR, and on deafness. London: Published by the Author, at 102, New Bond Street; and sold by Messrs. Simpkin and Marshall, Stationers’ Court; and all booksellers. 1836.

    1836. 8vo, pp. viii, 151, [1] advertisement, [2] blank, [4] testimonials; with wood-engraved illustrations; some occasional light foxing and soiling, otherwise clean and fresh; with the book-plate of Lord Fitzhardinge, Berkeley Castle, on front paste-down; First edition, presentation copy. Webster describes himself on the title-page as the “inventor of the Otaphone”, and indeed Webster was granted the first British patent for a hearing aid on March 17th 1836, the present work therefore doing much to promote his newly invented device. ‘The invention was first suggested by observing person at church, and other large assemblies, supporting the ear with the hand; which induced the author to consider whether the same advantage might not be obtained by means less troublesome and unsightly.…

    (more)

    1836. 8vo, pp. viii, 151, [1] advertisement, [2] blank, [4] testimonials; with wood-engraved illustrations; some occasional light foxing and soiling, otherwise clean and fresh; with the book-plate of Lord Fitzhardinge, Berkeley Castle, on front paste-down; First edition, presentation copy. Webster describes himself on the title-page as the “inventor of the Otaphone”, and indeed Webster was granted the first British patent for a hearing aid on March 17th 1836, the present work therefore doing much to promote his newly invented device. ‘The invention was first suggested by observing person at church, and other large assemblies, supporting the ear with the hand; which induced the author to consider whether the same advantage might not be obtained by means less troublesome and unsightly. His own experiences, and subsequent experiments in which he was assisted by his friends, soon convinced him of the correctness of his induction's; since which the Otaphones have been worn in both Houses of Parliament, on the Bench in the three divisions of the Empire, at places of Public Worship, the Theatres, and every public arena’ (p. 131-2). An example of the Otaphone can be found at the Becker Medical Library, as part of the Central Institute for the Deaf - Max A. Goldstein Historical Devices for Hearing Collection. It was constructed of pure silver, and painted beige to match the skin of the wearer. It was shaped into a curve to be placed in the back of the ear. A small hook secures the device. The design allowed the auricle (external part of the ear) to be projected forward to collect sound waves, much as if the wearer was cupping the ear.
    “The principal object which Mr. Webster seems to have contemplated by the publication of this treatise, is to afford useful and correct information regarding the ear to the general reader, especially to the deaf. This, we think, he has succeeded in doing; for, while his explanations of technical terms are such as any one may understand, he has adopted a scheme of distribution as regards the different parts of the ear, and their appropriate functions, that greatly tends to elucidate the subject. The author has made the particular organ in question the subject of long, and enlightened study; and from the success which has attended the application of the ‘Otaphone’ to the auricle, it may be added, that this study has been remarkably successful as regards its practical results.” (Monthly Review). One section is devoted to the musical ear in general, and to Mozart’s in particular, and is accompanied by an illustration of Mozart’s ear. In common with the Bodleian copy (and presumably all others), a space left for an illustration on p. 110 has been unfilled.

    (less)

    Condition: in the original drab boards, with mounted printed label on upper cover (a little scuffed and abraded with loss of a couple of letters), paper label on spine, chipped with small piece missing, 2cm loss of spine at tail, upper joint cracked at head, covers rather foxed and soiled, extremities bumped and lightly worn; a presentation copy from the author with inscription on title ‘The Right Honble Lord Segrave with the Author’s respectful Compts’

    View basket More details Price: £450.00
  • An Encyclopedia of Arts and Sciences - with full length portrait of William Harvey
    EIGHTEEN BOOKS OF THE SECRETS OF ART AND NATURE, by WECKER, Johann Jacob.
    WECKER, Johann Jacob.
    EIGHTEEN BOOKS OF THE SECRETS OF ART AND NATURE, being the summe and substance of Naturall philosophy, methodically digested. First designed by John Wecker Dr in Physick, and now much augmented and inlarged by Dr. R. Read. A like work never before in the English tongue. London: printed for Simon Miller at the Starre in St. Pauls Church-yard,

    1660. Folio, pp. [8] 346 (i.e. 336, 229–238 omitted) [12], of which index on pp. [1]–[8] and advertisements on [9]–[11], last page blank; woodcut printer’s device on title, woodcut head and tailpieces and initials, and numerous woodcut diagrams in the text; etched title-page incorporating 5 busts and 2 full length portraits, signed ‘Ric: Gaywood sculp’; paper slightly discoloured, with some occasional light spotting and soiling; First edition (reissued in the following year with a cancel title-page). A translation by William Rowland of Wecker’s De secreti libri xvii, edited and augmented by ‘Dr R. Read’ or ‘Reade’.
    Based on Wecker’s De secreti libri xvii, first published in 1582 and by now a brand name for the genre, this was conceived as…

    (more)

    1660. Folio, pp. [8] 346 (i.e. 336, 229–238 omitted) [12], of which index on pp. [1]–[8] and advertisements on [9]–[11], last page blank; woodcut printer’s device on title, woodcut head and tailpieces and initials, and numerous woodcut diagrams in the text; etched title-page incorporating 5 busts and 2 full length portraits, signed ‘Ric: Gaywood sculp’; paper slightly discoloured, with some occasional light spotting and soiling; First edition (reissued in the following year with a cancel title-page). A translation by William Rowland of Wecker’s De secreti libri xvii, edited and augmented by ‘Dr R. Read’ or ‘Reade’.
    Based on Wecker’s De secreti libri xvii, first published in 1582 and by now a brand name for the genre, this was conceived as ‘an Encyclopaedia of Arts and Sciences, interwoven with facetious Conceits to recreate the fancy’. The compiler, Dr R. Read or Reade, whose portrait is incorporated in the engraved title, has not been identified. He gives a long list of ‘Authors made use of in this Treatise’ which adds, Culpeper, Digby, Galileo, Harvey, Hobbs, Lady Howard and Platt to those used by Wecker. He sneaks in his own name between Rondolet and Rhasis. Every imaginable topic of natural science, natural magic, arts, trades, sports and pastimes is included, each secret attributed to an authority – from which it is clear that the list of authors is incomplete.
    The fine etched title-page is by Hollar’s pupil Richard Gaywood (c. 1630–1680) and incorporates full length portraits of Harvey and Bacon, and busts of Alexis of Piedmont, Albertus Magnus, Dr Read, Wecker and Lull. Gaywood was one of the most prolific etchers of his generation, active between 1644 and 1668, taking over from Hollar as the principal supplier of etched, as opposed to engraved portraits, and a collaborator with Francis Barlow. Johnson, Catalogue of Engraved and Etched English Title-pages records 14 of his title-pages (mistakenly giving his name as Robert) but overlooks this one.
    Harvey sat for a portrait in 1648 or 9, possibly to Hollar, which Evelyn records was ‘etcht by a friend of mine’. It was intended as a frontispiece to Harvey’s De generatione animalium (1651), but not used there, and shows Harvey as a rather sad old man. The etching is generally attributed to Gaywood, as is the engraved title to De generatione animalium. When he came to incorporate Harvey in the title-page here, where Harvey and Bacon hold back the curtains to reveal the words ‘secrets of art and nature’, Gaywood gives Harvey the same cloak with buttoned sleeves, but he is a more dapper figure in knee breeches showing a shapely leg. Gaywood made several portraits of Harvey, the earliest in about 1649, and the oil portrait in the National Portrait Gallery is after one his etchings.
    In 1884 Ferguson said the book was ‘far from being common’ and that his copy was ‘like all these books rather the worse for wear’. This is a rare copy in an excellent state, unrestored in its original blind ruled binding. Wing W1236; ESTC R12839; Ferguson 3, pp. 39–40 and supt. 3, p. 35; Krivatsy 12628; for Gaywood see Antony Griffiths, The print in Stuart Britain (1998), p. 169; for Gaywood’s earlier portrait of Harvey see Geoffrey Keynes, Life of William Harvey (1978), pp. 333–4 and plate XXVIII.

    (less)

    Condition: contemporary blind ruled unlettered sheep, with early paper shelf labels on spine, head of spine nicked, upper joint cracked and split at head and tail, lower joint split at head, spine somewhat rubbed, with further light wear and scuffing to covers and extremities; from the library of the Earls of Macclesfield with South Library bookplate on front paste-down, and embossed crest on prelims.

    View basket More details Price: £5,000.00
  • Evocative Aquatint
    LA NOURRICE by [WET-NURSING.] LE PRINCE, Jean-Baptiste.
    [WET-NURSING.] LE PRINCE, Jean-Baptiste.
    LA NOURRICE Etching with aquatint in brown, made after his designs from Russia. ca. 1760.

    1760. Single sheet laid paper, sheet size 180 x 210mm, plate size 177 x 206mm, trimmed along right margin and lower edge; somewhat browned with light wear to lower right corner. An evocative etching with aquatint in brown by Jean-Baptiste Le Prince (1734-1781), one of a number of images inspired by his five year stay in Russia between (1759-64). ‘La Nourrice’ was one of a suite of four images issued, including ‘Les Nouvellistes’, ‘Le Pont russe’ and ‘La Baraque russe’. We assume this to be an early state from this original issue of the suite.
    The present etching was later included in the folio ‘Oeuvres’ issued by Bazan in 1782 and which included nearly 160 etchings and aquatints.
    The…

    (more)

    1760. Single sheet laid paper, sheet size 180 x 210mm, plate size 177 x 206mm, trimmed along right margin and lower edge; somewhat browned with light wear to lower right corner. An evocative etching with aquatint in brown by Jean-Baptiste Le Prince (1734-1781), one of a number of images inspired by his five year stay in Russia between (1759-64). ‘La Nourrice’ was one of a suite of four images issued, including ‘Les Nouvellistes’, ‘Le Pont russe’ and ‘La Baraque russe’. We assume this to be an early state from this original issue of the suite.
    The present etching was later included in the folio ‘Oeuvres’ issued by Bazan in 1782 and which included nearly 160 etchings and aquatints.
    The painter and engraver Le Prince was a pupil of Boucher and Vien. He is credited with being the first artist to work in aquatint.

    (less)
    View basket More details Price: £225.00
  • LETTER-BAGS. by [WORD GAME]. [DRURY, MISS M. I., MISS O. H. DRURY, and Alexander MILLAR].
    [WORD GAME]. [DRURY, MISS M. I., MISS O. H. DRURY, and Alexander MILLAR].
    LETTER-BAGS. Regd. A word-making game for any number of players on an Entirely New Principle. “As Fascinating as Bridge”. Invented by the late Alexander Millar. [n.d. but ca.

    1920s?]. Consisting of one lidded card box 115 x 160m, containing within four separate lidded boxes 75 x 55mm; complete, each box containing a set of 90 different coloured lettered squares in white, blue, pink and yellow (of which five are blank in each set); upper lid of each with printed text giving the numbers of individual letters; sets bright and clean; some light soiling to boxes; seemingly without the original blue cloth ‘caller’s bag’ usually missing; A lovely bright set of this appealing game, similar in vein to scrabble, and seemingly the brainchild of two entrepreneurial sisters in Dublin. The game consists of a box containing four separate boxes, each of which contains 85 small square cards with letters…

    (more)

    1920s?]. Consisting of one lidded card box 115 x 160m, containing within four separate lidded boxes 75 x 55mm; complete, each box containing a set of 90 different coloured lettered squares in white, blue, pink and yellow (of which five are blank in each set); upper lid of each with printed text giving the numbers of individual letters; sets bright and clean; some light soiling to boxes; seemingly without the original blue cloth ‘caller’s bag’ usually missing; A lovely bright set of this appealing game, similar in vein to scrabble, and seemingly the brainchild of two entrepreneurial sisters in Dublin. The game consists of a box containing four separate boxes, each of which contains 85 small square cards with letters of the alphabet printed on both sides, together with a further 5 blank cards ‘to replace lost letters’. The four sets are printed in different colours: white, blue, pink and yellow.
    The present set retains the original instruction leaf: ‘The object of the game is to form as many and as long words as possible out of each of the sets of letters supplied ... each set contains 85 letters, the proportional quantities of each letter being the same as used by printers. Each set is kept in a small box or bag, with a larger bag for the “Caller”’. Each player takes a set, except for the “Caller”, who keeps his set n a bag ‘from which he draws them one by one at random’. As each letter is called, the player takes the corresponding letter from his set, and places them ‘in not more than six vertical or horizontal columns, endeavouring to arrange them so as to form complete words, reading vertically downwards or horizontally across’.
    According to the main lid, the game was ‘invented by the late Alexander Millar’, but as the instruction leaf reveals, and as previous examples handled have revealed, the marketing and distribution of the game appears to have been undertaken by two sisters. For this present example, the printed note states that the game could only be obtained from ‘Miss M. I. Drury’ of 2 Royal Terrace, Kingstown, Co. Dublin. An old address of ‘Farnagh, York Road’ has been crossed out in brown ink. Previous examples handled have had printed instructions noting that copies were available from ‘Miss O. H. Drury, Farnagh,, Kingstown, Dublin’. Our assumption is that this is a later version, and that for some reason Miss O. H. Drury was no longer involved in the enterprise. The existence of what we believe to be earlier sets suggests therefore that the game proved relatively popular. The price of the sets appears to have changed over time, varying from ‘Price 1/8 per set. Postage Extra. 1 set 4d., 2 sets 5d., etc’, through ‘2/6 set post free’, to the present set available for ‘3/6 per set, post free’. Other sets located in the Ballam Collection and at the National Trust Museum of Childhood. Only the Ballam collection set appears to retain the original blue callers’ bag. Sets located at the National Trust Museum of Childhood, in the Ballam Collection at the Bodleian, and in the Osborne Collection at Toronto.

    (less)

    Condition: in the original white box, upper lid printed, box lightly soiled and stained, small abrasion on base, light bumping to extremities; a good bright example.

    View basket More details Price: £150.00
  • Including styles ‘suitable for females’
    A NEW PLAN OF WRITING COPIES, by WRIFFORD, Allison.
    WRIFFORD, Allison.
    A NEW PLAN OF WRITING COPIES, with accompanying explanations and remarks, written, designed, and systematically arranged by A. Wrifford ... Engraved for the author, by D. Fairman, and printed by W. Hooker – and for sale by the various booksellers throughout the United States. Boston: W. Hooker for the author,

    1810. Small oblong 8vo, pp. 8; with 6 leaves of engraved writing samples; some light browning and staining, leave edges a little frayed; Apparently the first edition of this attractive penmanship copybook. Abel ‘Allison’ Wrifford (ca. 1780- 1844) was born at Hopkinton, Hillsborough, New Hampshire in 1779 and died there in 1844. He was teaching penmanship from at least 1809, the year before his New plan of writing copies was first published at Boston. He moved to Concord in 1831 and taught there and in the vicinity for several years (www.myrootsplace.com).
    Although he says the method of teaching is his own, Wrifford acknowledges that the elementary principles are taken from John Jenkins’ The art of writing, 1793. Jenkins’ work,…

    (more)

    1810. Small oblong 8vo, pp. 8; with 6 leaves of engraved writing samples; some light browning and staining, leave edges a little frayed; Apparently the first edition of this attractive penmanship copybook. Abel ‘Allison’ Wrifford (ca. 1780- 1844) was born at Hopkinton, Hillsborough, New Hampshire in 1779 and died there in 1844. He was teaching penmanship from at least 1809, the year before his New plan of writing copies was first published at Boston. He moved to Concord in 1831 and taught there and in the vicinity for several years (www.myrootsplace.com).
    Although he says the method of teaching is his own, Wrifford acknowledges that the elementary principles are taken from John Jenkins’ The art of writing, 1793. Jenkins’ work, first published in Boston in 1791, was the first original American handwriting manual and was quickly copied or imitated, first by Henry Dean’s Improved analytical guide (Salem, 1805), then by James Carver’s New and easy introduction (Philadelphia, 1809). In later editions, Wrifford dropped his acknowledgement to Jenkins. What is odd about his citation of the 1793 edition of Jenkins is that no such edition survives (the 1813 edition is always referred to as the second), so Wrifford is either mistaken about the date, or he is referring to an edition which is now lost.
    Further editions of Wrifford’s work appeared in 1812 and 1813. Shaw & Shoemaker, 22109; Nash, American Penmanship, 38; not in Bonacini or Berlin; R. Williams, ‘Without a borrowed hand: the beginnings of American penmanship’ Society of Scribes Journal (2000), 3–11; OCLC locates copies at Columbia, Yale, Chicago, Indiana, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Minnesota, Dartmouth College, Princeton, the American Antiquarian Society, the Huntington, and the British Library.

    (less)

    Condition: stab stitched in the original sugar paper wrappers with printed title label on upper cover.

    View basket More details Price: £650.00
  • ATTRACTIVELY PENNED CHILD’S EXERCISE BOOK by [WUILLEUMIER, Emma.]
    [WUILLEUMIER, Emma.]
    ATTRACTIVELY PENNED CHILD’S EXERCISE BOOK the first seven pages of which contain a manuscript entitled "Notions du corps humain", and signed by Emma Wuilleumier. [n.p., and n.d., but possibly France of Belgium, and ca. 1840s.]

    1840s. Slim 4to, 210 x 171mm, ff. 21, of which the first four leaves have been neatly penned in brown ink, the remaining leaves remaining blank and unused; with faint ruled vertical margin in pencil, some faint pencil corrections and markings; A most appealing child’s manuscript exercise book, outlining some basic principles of anatomy and physiology, and the work of young Emma Wuilleumier, who has also written her name on the front cover. Though her studies appear not have lasted for very long, sections focus upon the bones and skeleton, the trunk of the body, the arms and legs, and the muscles and tendons. This is a very attractive example of an embossed paper binding, designed for use by children…

    (more)

    1840s. Slim 4to, 210 x 171mm, ff. 21, of which the first four leaves have been neatly penned in brown ink, the remaining leaves remaining blank and unused; with faint ruled vertical margin in pencil, some faint pencil corrections and markings; A most appealing child’s manuscript exercise book, outlining some basic principles of anatomy and physiology, and the work of young Emma Wuilleumier, who has also written her name on the front cover. Though her studies appear not have lasted for very long, sections focus upon the bones and skeleton, the trunk of the body, the arms and legs, and the muscles and tendons. This is a very attractive example of an embossed paper binding, designed for use by children and rarely found in good condition.

    (less)

    Condition: stitched as issued, and most attractively bound in pink paper wrappers, heavily embossed in cream and pink to form a decorative cartouche within a single line frame, on a blue background, at the centre of the cartouches are oval hand-coloured lithographs of adults and children in garden settings, with a stork on the upper cover and ducks on the lower.

    View basket More details Price: £350.00
  • Fighting the ‘enemies in our midst’ and routing out the German Fifth Column - Kitchener’s sister at the forefront
    PRINTED AGENDA AND FOUR RELATED NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS by [WWI]. [WOMEN'S IMPERIAL DEFENCE COUNCIL.]
    [WWI]. [WOMEN'S IMPERIAL DEFENCE COUNCIL.]
    PRINTED AGENDA AND FOUR RELATED NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS concerning the little-known and short-lived British Women’s Organisation, the Women’s Imperial Defence Council, and relating to the two meetings held on February 8th, and March 4th 1918. London,

    1918. Single folio sheet of thick card, 365 x 263mm, seemingly once part of a larger scrapbook of clippings but now loose, with typed agenda sheet and four small related newspaper clippings mounted on verso; recto comprised of a number of unrelated mounted newspaper clippings, small photographs, and membership forms; with remains of linen mount along one margin, card somewhat browned, with some marginal nicks and wear. An unusual, and at first glance rather innocuous if somewhat mysterious, collection of memorabilia, but which in fact shines a light upon the febrile climate of paranoia and suspicion which gripped London and the nation during WWI.
    According to the Dictionary of British Women’s Organisations, 1825-1960, the Women’s Imperial Defence Council as a…

    (more)

    1918. Single folio sheet of thick card, 365 x 263mm, seemingly once part of a larger scrapbook of clippings but now loose, with typed agenda sheet and four small related newspaper clippings mounted on verso; recto comprised of a number of unrelated mounted newspaper clippings, small photographs, and membership forms; with remains of linen mount along one margin, card somewhat browned, with some marginal nicks and wear. An unusual, and at first glance rather innocuous if somewhat mysterious, collection of memorabilia, but which in fact shines a light upon the febrile climate of paranoia and suspicion which gripped London and the nation during WWI.
    According to the Dictionary of British Women’s Organisations, 1825-1960, the Women’s Imperial Defence Council as a ‘non-political body’ ... only known from a report of a meeting at the Cannon Street Hotel, London, in 1917, chaired by General Sir Arthur Turner, and addressed exclusively to men, including the future Home Secretary, Sir William Joynson-Hicks’ (p. 169). This meeting, as revealed by the mounted printed agenda, was held on February 8th, 1917 at 2.30pm, with further speeches by Dr Ellis Powell, Mr Arnold White, and A. G. Hales. Such was the interest generated by this first gathering, that a second meeting was organised and held on March 4th at Queen’s Hall, for which over 8000 tickets were apparently sent out, according to the clippings also included here. It was presided over by ‘Mrs Parker, sister of the late Lord Kitchener’.
    The formation of the Council, even though it appears to have proven only short-lived, gave a public forum and voice to the firm belief held by many of the existence of a secret German backed cabal or ‘Unseen Hand’, which since the beginning of the war was thought to have been undermining the very ability of the country effectively to pursue the war, by carrying out acts of espionage, and entrapping leading figures of government and the City alike through high-level vice rings, accusations of sexual perversion, female prostitution and bondage rackets. Spy fever inevitably gripped the nation, with over 9000 reports of suspected espionage received by the Metropolitan Police by September 1914. The sinking of the Lusitania in May 1915 only served to heighten the conspiracy theories. The ‘enemy in our midsts’ became an obsession and by the spring of 1917, when the Council held their meetings, MI5 had amassed the names of 250,000 aliens in Britain, with more detailed files held for over 27,000 suspects.
    As the printed agenda states, the purpose of the meeting was to demand:’That the Government shall appoint without delay a Royal Commission to make a full investigation as to the identity, or identities, of that treacherous influence in our midst know as the “Unseen Hand”. Further, that the Government shall at once dispense with the services, for the period of the War, of all Officials in the Foreign Office, who have married German subjects, or who have any German connections’.
    The apotheosis of this outpouring of suspicion and paranoia, came in the following May, during the infamous libel trial brought by the well-known ‘barefoot’ dancer Maud Allan, against the right wing MP Noel Pemberton Billing - a close associate of one of the speakers at the Cannon Street Hotel, Arnold White. An extraordinary trial which gripped the nation for some six days, Allan was implicitly accused of homosexuality, being rumoured to have had a relationship with Margot Asquith, whilst at the same time being accused of being a German sympathiser by virtue of having undertaken musical training in Berlin. Her ‘erotic’ dancing performances, as well as her recent private appearance in a performance of Oscar Wilde’s notorious play Salome, led to accusations of sexual perversions and sadism. Billing and his associates effectively sealed her fate, however, by their assertion of the existence of a ‘black book’ in the possession of the Germans, and naming 47,000 English men and women vulnerable to blackmail because of their ‘sexual perversions’. During the trial the names of the former PM Herbert Asquith, Margot Asquith, and even of the presiding judge, Justice Darling, were among those mentioned in the book. The book never materialised, but in a way was all the more powerful by its absence. Upon this mythical book was projected a set of paranoid fears and fantasies, concerning the conduct of the war which were at the time incapable of refutation. The trial appears farcical to the modern eye, shamefully conducted on both sides, and with a huge amount of hysteria and baseless accusations. Nevertheless, the prevailing mood of suspicion held sway, and Billings was found not guilty. Pressure mounted on the government and legislation was passed to close German banks, and large rallies continued to be held throughout the summer calling for increasing internment. see Lucy Bland, Modern Women on Trial, p. 39; the British Library holds various unidentified pamphlets and ephemera.

    (less)
    View basket More details Price: £125.00
Page:1678